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Review

Role of Probiotics in the Management of COVID-19: A Computational Perspective

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Centre for Bioinformatics, School of Data Sciences, Perdana University, Suite 9.2, 9th Floor, Wisma Chase Perdana, Changkat Semantan, Wilayah Persekutuan, Kuala Lumpur 50490, Malaysia
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Beykoz Institute of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Beykoz, Istanbul 34820, Turkey
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Department of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, 280 Daehak-Ro, Gyeongsan 38541, Gyeongbuk, Korea
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Probionic Corporation, Jeonbuk Institute for Food-Bioindustry, Jeonju 54810, Korea
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Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Center of Excellence in Bionanoscience Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose M. Soriano
Nutrients 2022, 14(2), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020274
Received: 16 December 2021 / Revised: 6 January 2022 / Accepted: 7 January 2022 / Published: 10 January 2022
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic at the beginning of 2020, causing millions of deaths worldwide. Millions of vaccine doses have been administered worldwide; however, outbreaks continue. Probiotics are known to restore a stable gut microbiota by regulating innate and adaptive immunity within the gut, demonstrating the possibility that they may be used to combat COVID-19 because of several pieces of evidence suggesting that COVID-19 has an adverse impact on gut microbiota dysbiosis. Thus, probiotics and their metabolites with known antiviral properties may be used as an adjunctive treatment to combat COVID-19. Several clinical trials have revealed the efficacy of probiotics and their metabolites in treating patients with SARS-CoV-2. However, its molecular mechanism has not been unraveled. The availability of abundant data resources and computational methods has significantly changed research finding molecular insights between probiotics and COVID-19. This review highlights computational approaches involving microbiome-based approaches and ensemble-driven docking approaches, as well as a case study proving the effects of probiotic metabolites on SARS-CoV-2. View Full-Text
Keywords: probiotics; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; gut-lung axis; microbiome; computational approach; molecular docking probiotics; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; gut-lung axis; microbiome; computational approach; molecular docking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nguyen, Q.V.; Chong, L.C.; Hor, Y.-Y.; Lew, L.-C.; Rather, I.A.; Choi, S.-B. Role of Probiotics in the Management of COVID-19: A Computational Perspective. Nutrients 2022, 14, 274. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020274

AMA Style

Nguyen QV, Chong LC, Hor Y-Y, Lew L-C, Rather IA, Choi S-B. Role of Probiotics in the Management of COVID-19: A Computational Perspective. Nutrients. 2022; 14(2):274. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020274

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nguyen, Quang V., Li C. Chong, Yan-Yan Hor, Lee-Ching Lew, Irfan A. Rather, and Sy-Bing Choi. 2022. "Role of Probiotics in the Management of COVID-19: A Computational Perspective" Nutrients 14, no. 2: 274. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14020274

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