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Article

Artificial Sweeteners in Breast Milk: A Clinical Investigation with a Kinetic Perspective

1
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital and Steno Diabetes Centre Aarhus, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
2
Comparative Medicine Laboratory, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
3
Institute for Clinical Medicine, Health, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark
4
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Aarhus University Hospital, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Megumi Haruna
Nutrients 2022, 14(13), 2635; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132635
Received: 29 May 2022 / Revised: 18 June 2022 / Accepted: 23 June 2022 / Published: 25 June 2022
Artificial sweeteners (ASs) are calorie-free chemical substances used instead of sugar to sweeten foods and drinks. Pregnant women with obesity or diabetes are often recommended to substitute sugary products with ASs to prevent an increase in body weight. However, some recent controversy surrounding ASs relates to concerns about the risk of obesity caused by a variety of metabolic changes, both in the mother and the offspring. This study addressed these concerns and investigated the biodistribution of ASs in plasma and breast milk of lactating women to clarify whether ASs can transfer from mother to offspring through breast milk. We recruited 49 lactating women who were provided with a beverage containing four different ASs (acesulfame-potassium, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose). Blood and breast milk samples were collected before and up to six hours after consumption. The women were categorized: BMI < 25 (n = 20), BMI > 27 (n = 21) and type 1 diabetes (n = 8). We found that all four ASs were present in maternal plasma and breast milk. The time-to-peak was 30–120 min in plasma and 240–300 min in breast milk. Area under the curve (AUC) ratios in breast milk were 88.9% for acesulfame-potassium, 38.9% for saccharin, and 1.9% for cyclamate. We observed no differences in ASs distributions between the groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; breast milk; artificial sweeteners; offspring health; lactation; infant; nutrition breastfeeding; breast milk; artificial sweeteners; offspring health; lactation; infant; nutrition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stampe, S.; Leth-Møller, M.; Greibe, E.; Hoffmann-Lücke, E.; Pedersen, M.; Ovesen, P. Artificial Sweeteners in Breast Milk: A Clinical Investigation with a Kinetic Perspective. Nutrients 2022, 14, 2635. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132635

AMA Style

Stampe S, Leth-Møller M, Greibe E, Hoffmann-Lücke E, Pedersen M, Ovesen P. Artificial Sweeteners in Breast Milk: A Clinical Investigation with a Kinetic Perspective. Nutrients. 2022; 14(13):2635. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132635

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stampe, Sofie, Magnus Leth-Møller, Eva Greibe, Elke Hoffmann-Lücke, Michael Pedersen, and Per Ovesen. 2022. "Artificial Sweeteners in Breast Milk: A Clinical Investigation with a Kinetic Perspective" Nutrients 14, no. 13: 2635. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14132635

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