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Article

Association of Prenatal Sugar Consumption with Newborn Brain Tissue Organization

1
Department of Pediatrics, The Saban Research Institute, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA
2
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kimber L. Stanhope
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2435; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072435
Received: 6 April 2021 / Revised: 30 June 2021 / Accepted: 14 July 2021 / Published: 16 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Early Life and Health Outcome)
Animal studies have shown that exposure to excess sugar during the prenatal and postnatal periods may alter early brain structure in rat pups. However, evidence in humans is lacking. The aim of this study was to determine associations of maternal total and added sugar intake in pregnancy with early brain tissue organization in infants. Adolescent mothers (n = 41) were recruited during pregnancy and completed 24 h dietary recalls during the second trimester. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed on infants using a 3.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner at 3 weeks. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were constructed. A multiple linear regression was used to examine voxel-wise associations across the brain. Adjusting for postmenstrual age, sex, birth weight, and total energy intake revealed that maternal total and added sugar consumption were associated inversely and diffusely with infant MD values, not FA values. Inverse associations were distributed throughout all of the cortical mantle, including the posterior periphery (Bs = −6.78 to −0.57, Ps < 0.001) and frontal lobe (Bs = −4.72 to −0.77, Ps ≤ 0.002). Our findings suggest that maternal total and added sugar intake during the second trimester are significantly associated with features of brain tissue organization in infants, the foundation for future functional outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: pregnancy; infant; added sugar; brain development; magnetic resonance imaging pregnancy; infant; added sugar; brain development; magnetic resonance imaging
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MDPI and ACS Style

Berger, P.K.; Monk, C.; Bansal, R.; Sawardekar, S.; Goran, M.I.; Peterson, B.S. Association of Prenatal Sugar Consumption with Newborn Brain Tissue Organization. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072435

AMA Style

Berger PK, Monk C, Bansal R, Sawardekar S, Goran MI, Peterson BS. Association of Prenatal Sugar Consumption with Newborn Brain Tissue Organization. Nutrients. 2021; 13(7):2435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072435

Chicago/Turabian Style

Berger, Paige K., Catherine Monk, Ravi Bansal, Siddhant Sawardekar, Michael I. Goran, and Bradley S. Peterson. 2021. "Association of Prenatal Sugar Consumption with Newborn Brain Tissue Organization" Nutrients 13, no. 7: 2435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072435

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