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Saudi Arabia’s Healthy Food Strategy: Progress & Hurdles in the 2030 Road

1
Healthy Food Department, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, Riyadh 13513-7148, Saudi Arabia
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Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO), World Health Organization (WHO), Cairo 11371, Egypt
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Nutrition Department, School of Health Sciences, Modern University of Business and Sciences, Beirut 113-7501, Lebanon
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Linda Monaci
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2130; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072130
Received: 19 April 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 June 2021 / Published: 22 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is a leading country worldwide in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), which alone can explain 73% of mortality in the country. In response to the heavy burden of NCDs, the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA), in collaboration with other government entities, developed a healthy food strategy (HFS) aimed at enhancing healthy lifestyles and reducing the intake of salt, sugar, saturated fatty acids (SSF) and trans fatty acids (TFA). The objectives of the HFS, to facilitate consumers’ identification of SSF and reduce the SSF and TFA content in food items, were addressed in collaboration with key stakeholders in the public and private sectors of the food industry. These reforms included voluntary and mandatory schemes to display nutrition information in food and beverage establishments, display allergens on food menus, encourage the adoption of front of pack nutrient labels (FoPNLs) on food products, ban the use of partially hydrogenated oils and establish limits for sodium composition in breads and selected food products. This manuscript contextualizes the HFS and presents the results of monitoring initiatives undertaken by the SFDA to assess compliance with these reforms. View Full-Text
Keywords: health policies; nutrition; nutrient labels; trans fatty acids; non-communicable diseases; obesity; KSA; Eastern Mediterranean region health policies; nutrition; nutrient labels; trans fatty acids; non-communicable diseases; obesity; KSA; Eastern Mediterranean region
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bin Sunaid, F.F.; Al-Jawaldeh, A.; Almutairi, M.W.; Alobaid, R.A.; Alfuraih, T.M.; Bensaidan, F.N.; Alragea, A.S.; Almutairi, L.A.; Duhaim, A.F.; Alsaloom, T.A.; Jabbour, J. Saudi Arabia’s Healthy Food Strategy: Progress & Hurdles in the 2030 Road. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2130. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072130

AMA Style

Bin Sunaid FF, Al-Jawaldeh A, Almutairi MW, Alobaid RA, Alfuraih TM, Bensaidan FN, Alragea AS, Almutairi LA, Duhaim AF, Alsaloom TA, Jabbour J. Saudi Arabia’s Healthy Food Strategy: Progress & Hurdles in the 2030 Road. Nutrients. 2021; 13(7):2130. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072130

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bin Sunaid, Faisal F., Ayoub Al-Jawaldeh, Meshal W. Almutairi, Rawan A. Alobaid, Tagreed M. Alfuraih, Faisal N. Bensaidan, Atheer S. Alragea, Lulu A. Almutairi, Ali F. Duhaim, Talal A. Alsaloom, and Jana Jabbour. 2021. "Saudi Arabia’s Healthy Food Strategy: Progress & Hurdles in the 2030 Road" Nutrients 13, no. 7: 2130. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072130

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