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Article

Patient Perspectives of Living with Coeliac Disease and Accessing Dietetic Services in Rural Australia: A Qualitative Study

1
School of Health Sciences, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Dubbo Health Service, Western NSW Local Health District, Dubbo, NSW 2830, Australia
3
Department of Rural Health, College of Health Medicine and Wellbeing, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW 2340, Australia
4
Tamworth Rural Referral Hospital, Hunter New England Local Health District, Tamworth, NSW 2340, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Isabel Comino, Carolina Sousa and David S. Sanders
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062074
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 12 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gluten Related Disorders: Coeliac Disease and Beyond)
Adapting to living with coeliac disease requires individuals to learn about and follow a strict gluten-free diet. Utilising a qualitative inductive approach, this study aimed to explore the perspectives of adults diagnosed with coeliac disease who have accessed dietetic services in a rural outpatient setting. A purposive sample of adults with coeliac disease who had accessed dietetic services from two rural dietetic outpatient clinics were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by telephone. Data were thematically analysed. Six participants were recruited and interviewed. Three key themes emerged: (i) optimising individualised support and services, (ii) adapting to a gluten-free diet in a rural context, and (iii) managing a gluten-free diet within the context of interpersonal relationships. Key issues identified in the rural context were access to specialist services and the increased cost of gluten-free food in more remote areas. The findings of this study have highlighted the difficulties associated with coeliac disease management and how dietetic consultation has the potential to influence confidence in management and improve lifestyle outcomes. Further qualitative research is required to expand on the findings of this study and inform future dietetic practice that meets the expectations and individual needs of people with coeliac disease in rural settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: coeliac disease; dietitian; rural health services coeliac disease; dietitian; rural health services
MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, R.; Crowley, E.T.; Baines, S.K.; Heaney, S.; Brown, L.J. Patient Perspectives of Living with Coeliac Disease and Accessing Dietetic Services in Rural Australia: A Qualitative Study. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2074. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062074

AMA Style

Lee R, Crowley ET, Baines SK, Heaney S, Brown LJ. Patient Perspectives of Living with Coeliac Disease and Accessing Dietetic Services in Rural Australia: A Qualitative Study. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):2074. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062074

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lee, Rachelle, Elesa T. Crowley, Surinder K. Baines, Susan Heaney, and Leanne J. Brown 2021. "Patient Perspectives of Living with Coeliac Disease and Accessing Dietetic Services in Rural Australia: A Qualitative Study" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 2074. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062074

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