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Article

Short-Term Protein Supplementation Does Not Alter Energy Intake, Macronutrient Intake and Appetite in 50–75 Year Old Adults

1
Department of Oncology and Metabolism, The Medical School, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK
2
School of Health and Related Research, Regent Court, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 4AD, UK
3
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Population Health Sciences Institute, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle NE2 4HH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Matteo Tosato and Marleen van Baak
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051711
Received: 27 March 2021 / Revised: 20 April 2021 / Accepted: 14 May 2021 / Published: 18 May 2021
Ageing is associated with a reduction in muscle mass and strength, termed sarcopenia. Dietary protein is important for the maintenance of muscle mass through the promotion of muscle protein synthesis. However, protein is also reported to be a highly satiating nutrient. This raises concerns that protein intake for musculoskeletal health reasons in older adults may exacerbate age-related decreased appetite and may result in reduced energy and nutrient intake. This study aimed to investigate the effect of short-term protein supplementation and its timing (morning vs. evening), on energy and nutrient intake and appetite measures in middle-older age adults. Twenty-four 50–75 year olds were recruited to a randomised cross-over trial. In phase 1 (pre-supplementation) participants completed a food diary and reported hunger and appetite on three alternate days. During the second and third phases, participants consumed a 20 g whey protein gel (78 mL/368 kJ), for four days, either in the morning (after breakfast) or the evening (before bed), whilst completing the same assessments as phase 1. No differences in dietary intakes of energy, macronutrients and micronutrients were recorded when comparing the pre-supplementation phase to the protein supplementation phases, irrespective of timing (excluding the contribution of the protein supplement itself). Similarly, no differences were observed in self-reported feelings of hunger and appetite. In conclusion, a 20 g/day whey protein supplement given outside of meal-times did not alter habitual dietary intakes, hunger or appetite in this middle-older age adult population in the short-term. This approach may be a useful strategy to increasing habitual protein intake in the middle-older age population. View Full-Text
Keywords: sarcopenia; protein; appetite; supplementation sarcopenia; protein; appetite; supplementation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tuttiett, E.R.; Green, D.J.; Stevenson, E.J.; Hill, T.R.; Corfe, B.M.; Williams, E.A. Short-Term Protein Supplementation Does Not Alter Energy Intake, Macronutrient Intake and Appetite in 50–75 Year Old Adults. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051711

AMA Style

Tuttiett ER, Green DJ, Stevenson EJ, Hill TR, Corfe BM, Williams EA. Short-Term Protein Supplementation Does Not Alter Energy Intake, Macronutrient Intake and Appetite in 50–75 Year Old Adults. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051711

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tuttiett, Esme R., Dan J. Green, Emma J. Stevenson, Thomas R. Hill, Bernard M. Corfe, and Elizabeth A. Williams. 2021. "Short-Term Protein Supplementation Does Not Alter Energy Intake, Macronutrient Intake and Appetite in 50–75 Year Old Adults" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051711

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