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Article

Associations between Children’s Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity, Infant’s Appetite and Parental Feeding Practices in Toddlerhood

1
Université de Paris, CRESS, INSERM, INRAE, F-75004 Paris, France
2
Unité Mixte Inserm-Ined-EFS ELFE, Ined, F-75020 Paris, France
3
MRC Epidemiology Unit and Department of Paediatrics, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Odysseas Androutsos and Evangelia Charmandari
Nutrients 2021, 13(5), 1468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051468
Received: 8 March 2021 / Revised: 20 April 2021 / Accepted: 23 April 2021 / Published: 26 April 2021
Previous findings suggest that parental feeding practices may adapt to children’s eating behavior and sex, but few studies assessed these associations in toddlerhood. We aimed to study the associations between infant’s appetite or children’s genetic susceptibility to obesity and parental feeding practices. We assessed infant’s appetite (three-category indicator: low, normal or high appetite, labelled 4-to-24-month appetite) and calculated a combined obesity risk-allele score (genetic risk score of body mass index (BMI-GRS)) in a longitudinal study of respectively 1358 and 932 children from the EDEN cohort. Parental feeding practices were assessed at 2-year-follow-up by the CFPQ. Three of the five tested scores were used as continuous variables; others were considered as binary variables, according to the median. Associations between infant’s appetite or child’s BMI-GRS and parental feeding practices were assessed by linear and logistic regression models, stratified on child’s sex if interactions were significant. 4-to-24-month appetite was positively associated with restrictive feeding practices among boys and girls. Among boys, high compared to normal 4-to-24-month appetite was associated with higher use of food to regulate child’s emotions (OR [95% CI] = 2.24 [1.36; 3.68]). Child’s BMI-GRS was not related to parental feeding practices. Parental feeding practices may adapt to parental perception of infant’s appetite and child’s sex. View Full-Text
Keywords: parental feeding practices; genetic susceptibility to obesity; eating behavior; birth cohort parental feeding practices; genetic susceptibility to obesity; eating behavior; birth cohort
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MDPI and ACS Style

Guivarch, C.; Charles, M.-A.; Forhan, A.; Ong, K.K.; Heude, B.; de Lauzon-Guillain, B. Associations between Children’s Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity, Infant’s Appetite and Parental Feeding Practices in Toddlerhood. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1468. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051468

AMA Style

Guivarch C, Charles M-A, Forhan A, Ong KK, Heude B, de Lauzon-Guillain B. Associations between Children’s Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity, Infant’s Appetite and Parental Feeding Practices in Toddlerhood. Nutrients. 2021; 13(5):1468. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051468

Chicago/Turabian Style

Guivarch, Claire, Marie-Aline Charles, Anne Forhan, Ken K. Ong, Barbara Heude, and Blandine de Lauzon-Guillain. 2021. "Associations between Children’s Genetic Susceptibility to Obesity, Infant’s Appetite and Parental Feeding Practices in Toddlerhood" Nutrients 13, no. 5: 1468. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13051468

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