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Article

Recipe Components and Parents’ Infant and Young Child Feeding Concerns: A Mixed-Methods Study of Recipe Posts Shared in Thai Facebook Groups for Parents

1
Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Acton, Canberra 2601, Australia
2
School of Human Ecology, Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University, Nonthaburi 11120, Thailand
3
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, University of New South Wales, Kensington, Sydney 2033, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fabrizio Sanna
Nutrients 2021, 13(4), 1186; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041186
Received: 5 February 2021 / Revised: 1 April 2021 / Accepted: 1 April 2021 / Published: 3 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Food Environments, Food Choice and Public Health)
Social media is increasingly becoming a significant source of information for parents, including about feeding young children. However, little attention has been given to the characteristics of recipes for infants and young children and how they interact with parental perceptions regarding food decisions shared by users on social media. Building on findings related to shared recipe components and parental food choices, between December 2019 and July 2020, this study retrospectively collected 80 shared recipes each from five Thai Facebook groups. This extraction created 379 shared recipes with 1751 peers’ commentaries on the shared recipes’ posts. The shared recipes were classified and components quantified across child age groups, then the textual contents around the reasons behind the food choices were described qualitatively. The results showed that there were differences in meal types, food ingredients, and seasoning used across child age groups. Further analysis found that food allergy awareness was one driving concern behind parental perceptions on food choices in children’s diets. These concerns resulted in delays in the introduction of animal-source foods. Moreover, peers’ commentaries on shared recipes offered a venue for exchanging experiences with food products. Because of the potential influence on parental beliefs and perceptions, further studies are required to understand the impact of existing online communities on actual feeding practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: social media; Facebook; infants and young child feeding; food choice; mixed-methods; Thai social media; Facebook; infants and young child feeding; food choice; mixed-methods; Thai
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MDPI and ACS Style

Supthanasup, A.; Banwell, C.; Kelly, M.; Yiengprugsawan, V.S. Recipe Components and Parents’ Infant and Young Child Feeding Concerns: A Mixed-Methods Study of Recipe Posts Shared in Thai Facebook Groups for Parents. Nutrients 2021, 13, 1186. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041186

AMA Style

Supthanasup A, Banwell C, Kelly M, Yiengprugsawan VS. Recipe Components and Parents’ Infant and Young Child Feeding Concerns: A Mixed-Methods Study of Recipe Posts Shared in Thai Facebook Groups for Parents. Nutrients. 2021; 13(4):1186. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041186

Chicago/Turabian Style

Supthanasup, Abhirat; Banwell, Cathy; Kelly, Matthew; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara S. 2021. "Recipe Components and Parents’ Infant and Young Child Feeding Concerns: A Mixed-Methods Study of Recipe Posts Shared in Thai Facebook Groups for Parents" Nutrients 13, no. 4: 1186. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13041186

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