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Article

Effects of a Protein-Rich, Low-Glycaemic Meal Replacement on Changes in Dietary Intake and Body Weight Following a Weight-Management Intervention—The ACOORH Trial

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West-German Centre of Diabetes and Health, Düsseldorf Catholic Hospital Group, 40591 Düsseldorf, Germany
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Olympic Training Center Freiburg-Black Forest, 79117 Freiburg, Germany
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Human Nutrition Research Unit, Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada
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Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetology, Medical University of Graz, 8010 Graz, Austria
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Department of Sports and Movement Medicine, Faculty of Psychology and Human Movement Sciences, University of Hamburg, 20148 Hamburg, Germany
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DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany
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Department of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich (TUM), 80992 Munich, Germany
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Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Division of Laboratory Research, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany
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Public Health Nutrition Research Group, London Metropolitan University, London N7 8DB, UK
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Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, 50933 Cologne, Germany
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KARDIOS, Cardioligists in Berlin, 10787 Berlin, Germany
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Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, 79117 Freiburg, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Darren Candow
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020376
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 18 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrients Supporting an Active Lifestyle)
Although meal replacement can lead to weight reduction, there is uncertainty whether this dietary approach implemented into a lifestyle programme can improve long-term dietary intake. In this subanalysis of the Almased Concept against Overweight and Obesity and Related Health Risk (ACOORH) study (n = 463), participants with metabolic risk factors were randomly assigned to either a meal replacement-based lifestyle intervention group (INT) or a lifestyle intervention control group (CON). This subanalysis relies only on data of participants (n = 119) who returned correctly completed dietary records at baseline, and after 12 and 52 weeks. Both groups were not matched for nutrient composition at baseline. These data were further stratified by sex and also associated with weight change. INT showed a higher increase in protein intake related to the daily energy intake after 12 weeks (+6.37% [4.69; 8.04] vs. +2.48% [0.73; 4.23], p < 0.001) of intervention compared to CON. Fat and carbohydrate intake related to the daily energy intake were more strongly reduced in the INT compared to CON (both p < 0.01). After sex stratification, particularly INT-women increased their total protein intake after 12 (INT: +12.7 g vs. CON: −5.1 g, p = 0.021) and 52 weeks (INT: +5.7 g vs. CON: −16.4 g, p = 0.002) compared to CON. Protein intake was negatively associated with weight change (r = −0.421; p < 0.001) after 12 weeks. The results indicate that a protein-rich dietary strategy with a meal replacement can improve long-term nutritional intake, and was associated with weight loss. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein-rich diet; meal replacement; nutritional reports; weight loss protein-rich diet; meal replacement; nutritional reports; weight loss
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MDPI and ACS Style

Röhling, M.; Stensitzky, A.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Beck, A.; Braumann, K.M.; Halle, M.; Führer-Sakel, D.; Kempf, K.; McCarthy, D.; Predel, H.G.; Schenkenberger, I.; Toplak, H.; Berg, A. Effects of a Protein-Rich, Low-Glycaemic Meal Replacement on Changes in Dietary Intake and Body Weight Following a Weight-Management Intervention—The ACOORH Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 376. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020376

AMA Style

Röhling M, Stensitzky A, Oliveira CLP, Beck A, Braumann KM, Halle M, Führer-Sakel D, Kempf K, McCarthy D, Predel HG, Schenkenberger I, Toplak H, Berg A. Effects of a Protein-Rich, Low-Glycaemic Meal Replacement on Changes in Dietary Intake and Body Weight Following a Weight-Management Intervention—The ACOORH Trial. Nutrients. 2021; 13(2):376. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020376

Chicago/Turabian Style

Röhling, Martin, Andrea Stensitzky, Camila L.P. Oliveira, Andrea Beck, Klaus M. Braumann, Martin Halle, Dagmar Führer-Sakel, Kerstin Kempf, David McCarthy, Hans G. Predel, Isabelle Schenkenberger, Hermann Toplak, and Aloys Berg. 2021. "Effects of a Protein-Rich, Low-Glycaemic Meal Replacement on Changes in Dietary Intake and Body Weight Following a Weight-Management Intervention—The ACOORH Trial" Nutrients 13, no. 2: 376. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020376

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