Next Article in Journal
Association of Maternal Plasma Total Cysteine and Growth among Infants in Nepal: A Cohort Study
Previous Article in Journal
The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Taurine on Cardiovascular Disease
Open AccessArticle

Is Drinking Alcohol Really Linked to Cardiovascular Health? Evidence from the Kardiovize 2030 Project

1
International Clinical Research Center, St Anne’s University Hospital, 65691 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies “GF Ingrassia”, University of Catania, 95127 Catania, Italy
3
Division of Preventive Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Medical School, Rochester, MI 55905, USA
4
Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2848; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092848
Received: 2 September 2020 / Revised: 14 September 2020 / Accepted: 16 September 2020 / Published: 17 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Existing data have described benefits and drawbacks of alcohol consumption on cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but no research has evaluated its association with the cardiovascular health (CVH) score proposed by the American Heart Association. Here, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis on the Kardiovize cohort (Brno, Czech Republic), to investigate the relationship between alcohol consumption and CVH. We included 1773 subjects (aged 25–64 years; 44.2% men) with no history of CVD. We compared CVD risk factors, CVH metrics (i.e., BMI, healthy diet, physical activity level, smoking status, blood pressure, fasting glucose, and total cholesterol) and CVH score between and within several drinking categories. We found that the relationship between drinking habits and CVH was related to the amount of alcohol consumed, drinking patterns, and beverage choices. Heavy drinkers were more likely to smoke tobacco, and to report diastolic blood pressure, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol at higher level than non-drinkers. Among drinkers, however, people who exclusively drank wine exhibited better CVH than those who exclusively drank beer. Although our findings supported the hypothesis that drinking alcohol was related to the CVH in general, further prospective research is needed to understand whether the assessment of CVH should incorporate information on alcohol consumption. View Full-Text
Keywords: drinking habits; cardiovascular disease; nutritional epidemiology; cardiometabolic health; public health drinking habits; cardiovascular disease; nutritional epidemiology; cardiometabolic health; public health
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Maugeri, A.; Hlinomaz, O.; Agodi, A.; Barchitta, M.; Kunzova, S.; Bauerova, H.; Sochor, O.; Medina-Inojosa, J.R.; Lopez-Jimenez, F.; Vinciguerra, M.; Stokin, G.B.; González-Rivas, J.P. Is Drinking Alcohol Really Linked to Cardiovascular Health? Evidence from the Kardiovize 2030 Project. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2848.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop