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Optimisation and Validation of a Nutritional Intervention to Enhance Sleep Quality and Quantity

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School of Behavioural and Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Banyo QLD 4014, Australia
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High Performance Unit, Swimming Australia, Brisbane QLD 4519, Australia
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Rowing Australia, Yarralumla ACT 2600, Australia
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Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, Wayville 5034, Australia
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Gatorade Sport Science Institute, PepsiCo Global Research and Development-Life Sciences, Purchase, NY 10577, USA
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Departments of Neurobiology, Physiology & Behavior and Department of Physiology and Membrane Biology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95817, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2579; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092579
Received: 7 July 2020 / Revised: 19 August 2020 / Accepted: 20 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Background: Disturbed sleep may negatively influence physical health, cognitive performance, metabolism, and general wellbeing. Nutritional interventions represent a potential non-pharmacological means to increase sleep quality and quantity. Objective: (1) Identify an optimal suite of nutritional ingredients and (2) validate the effects of this suite utilising polysomnography, and cognitive and balance tests. Methods: The optimal and least optimal combinations of six ingredients were identified utilising 55 male participants and a Box–Behnken predictive model. To validate the model, 18 healthy, male, normal sleepers underwent three trials in a randomised, counterbalanced design: (1) optimal drink, (2) least optimal drink, or (3) placebo were provided before bed in a double-blinded manner. Polysomnography was utilised to measure sleep architecture. Cognitive performance, postural sway, and subjective sleep quality, were assessed 30 min after waking. Results: The optimal drink resulted in a significantly shorter sleep onset latency (9.9 ± 12.3 min) when compared to both the least optimal drink (26.1 ± 37.4 min) and the placebo drink (19.6 ± 32.0 min). No other measures of sleep, cognitive performance, postural sway, and subjective sleep quality were different between trials. Conclusion: A combination of ingredients, optimised to enhance sleep, significantly reduced sleep onset latency. No detrimental effects on sleep architecture, subjective sleep quality or next day performance were observed. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition; polysomnography; sleep onset latency nutrition; polysomnography; sleep onset latency
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MDPI and ACS Style

Halson, S.L.; Shaw, G.; Versey, N.; Miller, D.J.; Sargent, C.; Roach, G.D.; Nyman, L.; Carter, J.M.; Baar, K. Optimisation and Validation of a Nutritional Intervention to Enhance Sleep Quality and Quantity. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2579. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092579

AMA Style

Halson SL, Shaw G, Versey N, Miller DJ, Sargent C, Roach GD, Nyman L, Carter JM, Baar K. Optimisation and Validation of a Nutritional Intervention to Enhance Sleep Quality and Quantity. Nutrients. 2020; 12(9):2579. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092579

Chicago/Turabian Style

Halson, Shona L., Gregory Shaw, Nathan Versey, Dean J. Miller, Charli Sargent, Gregory D. Roach, Lara Nyman, James M. Carter, and Keith Baar. 2020. "Optimisation and Validation of a Nutritional Intervention to Enhance Sleep Quality and Quantity" Nutrients 12, no. 9: 2579. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092579

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