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Article

Association between Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Indicators and the Nutritional Status of Children (6–23 Months) in Northern Ghana

1
School of Public Health, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100131, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany
2
Department of Industrial and Health Sciences, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Takoradi Technical University, P.O. Box 256, WS000 Takoradi, Ghana
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, University for Development Studies, P.O. Box TL 1883, NT000 Tamale, Ghana
4
Institute of Gerontological Health Services and Nursing Research, Ravensburg-Weingarten University of Applied Sciences, 88250 Weingarten, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2565; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092565
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 20 August 2020 / Accepted: 21 August 2020 / Published: 24 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Although recommended infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices have been found to be protective against undernutrition in some settings, there is no finality yet due to inconsistencies in the literature. A cross-sectional survey of 581 mother-child pairs was conducted in northern Ghana in June 2018. The association between IYCF indicators and child undernutrition (stunting and wasting) were assessed. The descriptive analysis showed that 66.4% of the children (6–23 months) were introduced to complementary feeding in a timely manner, 69.4% met the minimum meal frequency, and 38.9% met the minimum acceptable diet daily. The prevalence of stunting, wasting, underweight and overweight was 33.2%, 14.1%, 27% and 2.6%, respectively. From the multivariable binary logistic regression, child gender, child age group and source of power for lighting the household were significantly associated with wasting. Intake of iron-rich foods, child age group, and maternal height were significantly associated with stunting after adjusting for confounders. The prevalence of the compliance with IYCF indicators was relatively high. None of the individual IYCF indicators showed significant association with undernutrition, except intake of iron-rich foods for stunting. Nutrition-specific interventions targeted at improving IYCF practices, dietary diversification and intake of nutrient-rich meals, should be adopted and scaled up to address undernutrition in northern Ghana. View Full-Text
Keywords: stunting; wasting; underweight; malnutrition; undernutrition; complementary feeding practices stunting; wasting; underweight; malnutrition; undernutrition; complementary feeding practices
MDPI and ACS Style

Anin, S.K.; Saaka, M.; Fischer, F.; Kraemer, A. Association between Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Indicators and the Nutritional Status of Children (6–23 Months) in Northern Ghana. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2565. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092565

AMA Style

Anin SK, Saaka M, Fischer F, Kraemer A. Association between Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Indicators and the Nutritional Status of Children (6–23 Months) in Northern Ghana. Nutrients. 2020; 12(9):2565. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092565

Chicago/Turabian Style

Anin, Stephen K., Mahama Saaka, Florian Fischer, and Alexander Kraemer. 2020. "Association between Infant and Young Child Feeding (IYCF) Indicators and the Nutritional Status of Children (6–23 Months) in Northern Ghana" Nutrients 12, no. 9: 2565. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092565

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