Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Plant-Based Dietary Patterns on Cancer-Related Outcomes: A Rapid Review and Meta-Analysis
Next Article in Special Issue
KiwiC for Vitality: Results of a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial Testing the Effects of Kiwifruit or Vitamin C Tablets on Vitality in Adults with Low Vitamin C Levels
Previous Article in Journal
Asaronic Acid Inhibited Glucose-Triggered M2-Phenotype Shift Through Disrupting the Formation of Coordinated Signaling of IL-4Rα-Tyk2-STAT6 and GLUT1-Akt-mTOR-AMPK
Previous Article in Special Issue
Factors Affecting Vitamin C Status and Prevalence of Deficiency: A Global Health Perspective
Review

Global Vitamin C Status and Prevalence of Deficiency: A Cause for Concern?

by 1 and 2,*
1
Department of Clinical Sciences, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool L35QA, UK
2
Nutrition in Medicine Research Group, Department of Pathology & Biomedical Science, University of Otago, Christchurch 8011, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 2008; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072008
Received: 24 May 2020 / Revised: 2 July 2020 / Accepted: 3 July 2020 / Published: 6 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vitamins C and D: Global and Population Health Perspectives)
Vitamin C is an essential nutrient that must be obtained through the diet in adequate amounts to prevent hypovitaminosis C, deficiency and its consequences—including the potentially fatal deficiency disease scurvy. Global vitamin C status and prevalence of deficiency has not previously been reported, despite vitamin C’s pleiotropic roles in both non-communicable and communicable disease. This review highlights the global literature on vitamin C status and the prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and deficiency. Related dietary intake is reported if assessed in the studies. Overall, the review illustrates the shortage of high quality epidemiological studies of vitamin C status in many countries, particularly low- and middle-income countries. The available evidence indicates that vitamin C hypovitaminosis and deficiency is common in low- and middle-income countries and not uncommon in high income settings. Further epidemiological studies are required to confirm these findings, to fully assess the extent of global vitamin C insufficiency, and to understand associations with a range of disease processes. Our findings suggest a need for interventions to prevent deficiency in a range of at risk groups and regions of the world. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin C status; hypovitaminosis C; vitamin C deficiency; low and middle income; LMIC; dietary intake; supplement; non-communicable disease; communicable disease; infection vitamin C status; hypovitaminosis C; vitamin C deficiency; low and middle income; LMIC; dietary intake; supplement; non-communicable disease; communicable disease; infection
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rowe, S.; Carr, A.C. Global Vitamin C Status and Prevalence of Deficiency: A Cause for Concern? Nutrients 2020, 12, 2008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072008

AMA Style

Rowe S, Carr AC. Global Vitamin C Status and Prevalence of Deficiency: A Cause for Concern? Nutrients. 2020; 12(7):2008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072008

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rowe, Sam; Carr, Anitra C. 2020. "Global Vitamin C Status and Prevalence of Deficiency: A Cause for Concern?" Nutrients 12, no. 7: 2008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12072008

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop