Next Article in Journal
Vitamin D Serum Levels in the UK Population, including a Mathematical Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Vitamin D Fortified Ready-to-Eat Breakfast Cereals: Application of the NDNS Database
Next Article in Special Issue
Development of Criteria for a Positive Front-of-Package Food Labeling: The Israeli Case
Previous Article in Journal
Supplementation with Whey Protein, Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Polyphenols Combined with Electrical Muscle Stimulation Increases Muscle Strength in Elderly Adults with Limited Mobility: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
Healthy Eating Policy Improves Children’s Diet Quality in Early Care and Education in South Carolina
Open AccessArticle

Participants’ Experiences of the 2018–2019 Government Shutdown and Subsequent Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefit Disruption Can Inform Future Policy

1
Nutrition Policy Institute, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA
2
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
3
Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Cooperative Extension, University of California, Davis, CA 95618, USA
4
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1867; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061867
Received: 19 May 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 16 June 2020 / Published: 23 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Policies and Diet)
The federal government shutdown from 22 December 2018 to 25 January 2019 created an unprecedented disruption in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. We conducted a cross-sectional qualitative study to begin to capture how the disruption affected food security and wellbeing among a small sample of California SNAP participants. We collected data from 26 low-income adults in four focus groups in four diverse California counties. We found that participants routinely struggle to secure an adequate and healthy diet in the context of high costs of living, the shutdown and benefit disruption added to participants’ stress and uncertainty and exacerbated food insecurity, and it diminished some participants’ faith in government. Participants reported that, while having additional benefits in January felt like a relief from typical end-of-month deprivation, the subsequent extended gap between benefit distributions and a lack of clarity about future benefits caused cascading effects as participants later had to divert money from other expenses to buy food and faced added uncertainty about future economic stability. Additionally, the shutdown highlighted challenges related to the availability, timing, and tone of communications between participants and SNAP agencies. Participants recommended that SNAP adjust benefit and eligibility levels to better address costs of living, improve customer service, and avoid future disruptions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; federal government shutdown; food insecurity; qualitative research; safety net; nutrition Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; federal government shutdown; food insecurity; qualitative research; safety net; nutrition
MDPI and ACS Style

Gosliner, W.; Chen, W.-T.; Johnson, C.; Esparza, E.M.; Price, N.; Hecht, K.; Ritchie, L. Participants’ Experiences of the 2018–2019 Government Shutdown and Subsequent Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefit Disruption Can Inform Future Policy. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1867.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop