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Mediterranean Diet and the Emotional Well-Being of Students of the Campus of Melilla (University of Granada)

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Doctoral Degree School, Melilla Campus, University of Granada, Calle Santander s/n, 52001 Melilla, Spain
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Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Melilla Campus, University of Granada, Calle Santander s/n, 52001 Melilla, Spain
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Department of Inorganic Chemistry, HUM-613 Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, Melilla Campus, University of Granada, Calle Santander s/n, 52001 Melilla, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1826; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061826
Received: 22 May 2020 / Revised: 13 June 2020 / Accepted: 17 June 2020 / Published: 19 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition Methodology & Assessment)
A certain link exists between the consumption of particular groups of food and well-being. In this study, we analyzed in depth the relationship between strict adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MD) and emotional well-being through a descriptive, exploratory, transversal, and correlational study of students from the Campus of Melilla, University of Granada, Spain. The sample consisted of 272 individuals. Adherence to the MD was measured with the PREvención con DIetaMEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire, emotional well-being (both positive and negative affection) with the Spanish version of the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the state of perceived health with the Short Form-36 (SF36), and the degree of physical activity using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire Short Form (IPAQ-SF). A strict adherence to the MD was found to be significantly related to positive emotional state (β = 0.018, p = 0.009). The perceived state of health (β = 0.192, p < 0.001), mental role (β = 0.346, p < 0.001), and physical activity (β = 0.155, p = 0.007) were found to be predictive factors of a positive emotional state. Conversely, the relationship between the adherence to the MD and a negative emotional state was not significant. Various components of the MD were found to be independently connected to well-being. The results suggest that adopting a nutritional pattern such as the MD is linked to an improvement in emotional well-being. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthy diet; positive affect; negative affect; state of health; healthy behavior healthy diet; positive affect; negative affect; state of health; healthy behavior
MDPI and ACS Style

López-Olivares, M.; Mohatar-Barba, M.; Fernández-Gómez, E.; Enrique-Mirón, C. Mediterranean Diet and the Emotional Well-Being of Students of the Campus of Melilla (University of Granada). Nutrients 2020, 12, 1826. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061826

AMA Style

López-Olivares M, Mohatar-Barba M, Fernández-Gómez E, Enrique-Mirón C. Mediterranean Diet and the Emotional Well-Being of Students of the Campus of Melilla (University of Granada). Nutrients. 2020; 12(6):1826. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061826

Chicago/Turabian Style

López-Olivares, María, Miriam Mohatar-Barba, Elisabet Fernández-Gómez, and Carmen Enrique-Mirón. 2020. "Mediterranean Diet and the Emotional Well-Being of Students of the Campus of Melilla (University of Granada)" Nutrients 12, no. 6: 1826. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061826

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