Next Article in Journal
Urinary Metabolic Profiling via LC-MS/MS Reveals Impact of Bovine Lactoferrin on Bone Formation in Growing SD Rats
Previous Article in Journal
The Study of Correlation between Serum Vitamin D3 Concentrations and HBV DNA Levels and Immune Response in Chronic Hepatitis Patients
Article

Short-Communication: Ingestion of a Nucleotide-Rich Mixed Meal Increases Serum Uric Acid Concentrations but Does Not Affect Postprandial Blood Glucose or Serum Insulin Responses in Young Adults

1
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK
2
UK Research and Innovation, Polaris House, Swindon SN2 1FL, UK
3
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry (CEAC), Energy and Bioproducts Research Institute (EBRI), Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK
4
Marlow Foods Ltd., Stokesley TS9 7AB, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041115
Received: 10 March 2020 / Revised: 10 April 2020 / Accepted: 14 April 2020 / Published: 17 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Metabolism)
Circulating uric acid concentrations have been linked to various metabolic diseases. Consumption of large boluses of nucleotides increases serum uric acid concentrations. We investigated the effect of a nucleotide-rich mixed meal on postprandial circulating uric acid, glucose, and insulin responses. Ten healthy adults participated in a randomised, controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in which they consumed a mixed-meal containing either nucleotide-depleted mycoprotein (L-NU) or high-nucleotide mycoprotein (H-NU) on two separate visits. Blood samples were collected in the postabsorptive state and throughout a 24 h postprandial period, and were used to determine circulating uric acid, glucose, and insulin concentrations. Mixed meal ingestion had divergent effects on serum uric acid concentrations across conditions (time x condition interaction; P < 0.001), with L-NU decreasing transiently (from 45 to 240 min postprandially) by ~7% (from 279 ± 16 to 257 ± 14 µmol·L−1) and H-NU resulting in a ~12% increase (from 284 ± 13 to 319 ± 12 µmol·L−1 after 210 min), remaining elevated for 12 h and returning to baseline concentrations after 24 h. There were no differences between conditions in blood glucose or serum insulin responses, nor in indices of insulin sensitivity. The ingestion of a nucleotide-rich mixed-meal increases serum uric acid concentrations for ~12 h, but does not influence postprandial blood glucose or serum insulin concentrations. View Full-Text
Keywords: nucleotides; serum uric acid; metabolic health; mycoprotein nucleotides; serum uric acid; metabolic health; mycoprotein
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Coelho, M.O.C.; Monteyne, A.J.; Kamalanathan, I.D.; Najdanovic-Visak, V.; Finnigan, T.J.A.; Stephens, F.B.; Wall, B.T. Short-Communication: Ingestion of a Nucleotide-Rich Mixed Meal Increases Serum Uric Acid Concentrations but Does Not Affect Postprandial Blood Glucose or Serum Insulin Responses in Young Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1115. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041115

AMA Style

Coelho MOC, Monteyne AJ, Kamalanathan ID, Najdanovic-Visak V, Finnigan TJA, Stephens FB, Wall BT. Short-Communication: Ingestion of a Nucleotide-Rich Mixed Meal Increases Serum Uric Acid Concentrations but Does Not Affect Postprandial Blood Glucose or Serum Insulin Responses in Young Adults. Nutrients. 2020; 12(4):1115. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041115

Chicago/Turabian Style

Coelho, Mariana O.C., Alistair J. Monteyne, Ishara D. Kamalanathan, Vesna Najdanovic-Visak, Tim J.A. Finnigan, Francis B. Stephens, and Benjamin T. Wall 2020. "Short-Communication: Ingestion of a Nucleotide-Rich Mixed Meal Increases Serum Uric Acid Concentrations but Does Not Affect Postprandial Blood Glucose or Serum Insulin Responses in Young Adults" Nutrients 12, no. 4: 1115. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041115

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop