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Open AccessArticle

Impact of the Method Used to Select Gas Exchange Data for Estimating the Resting Metabolic Rate, as Supplied by Breath-by-Breath Metabolic Carts

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PROFITH “PROmoting FITness and Health Through Physical Activity” Research Group, Sport and Health University Research Institute (iMUDS), Department of Physical and Sports Education, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
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Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA
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EFFECTS-262 Research Group, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
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Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Carrera de Nutrición y Dietética, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020487
Received: 23 December 2019 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 10 February 2020 / Published: 14 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Metabolism)
The method used to select representative gas exchange data from large datasets influences the resting metabolic rate (RMR) returned. This study determines which of three methods yields the lowest RMR (as recommended for use in human energy balance studies), and in which method the greatest variance in RMR is explained by classical determinants of this variable. A total of 107 young and 74 middle-aged adults underwent a 30 min RMR examination using a breath-by-breath metabolic cart. Three gas exchange data selection methods were used: (i) steady state (SSt) for 3, 4, 5, or 10 min, (ii) a pre-defined time interval (TI), i.e., 6–10, 11–15, 16–20, 21–25, 26–30, 6–25, or 6–30 min, and (iii) “filtering”, setting thresholds depending on the mean RMR value obtained. In both cohorts, the RMRs yielded by the SSt and filtering methods were significantly lower (p < 0.021) than those yielded by the TI method. No differences in RMR were seen under the different conditions of the SSt method, or of the filtering method. No differences were seen between the methods in terms of the variance in RMR explained by its classical determinants. In conclusion, the SSt and filtering methods return the lowest RMRs and intra-measurement coefficients of variation when using breath-by-breath metabolic carts.
Keywords: resting energy expenditure; CCM express; CPX Ultima CardiO2; indirect calorimetry; macronutrient oxidation resting energy expenditure; CCM express; CPX Ultima CardiO2; indirect calorimetry; macronutrient oxidation
MDPI and ACS Style

Alcantara, J.M.; Sanchez-Delgado, G.; Amaro-Gahete, F.J.; Galgani, J.E.; Ruiz, J.R. Impact of the Method Used to Select Gas Exchange Data for Estimating the Resting Metabolic Rate, as Supplied by Breath-by-Breath Metabolic Carts. Nutrients 2020, 12, 487.

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