Next Article in Journal
How Much Sugar is in My Drink? The Power of Visual Cues
Previous Article in Journal
Contribution of Milk Beverages to Nutrient Adequacy of Young Children and Preschool Children in the Philippines
Article

Free and Added Sugar Consumption and Adherence to Guidelines: The UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2014/15–2015/16)

1
NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) Diet, Anthropometry and Physical Activity Group, MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK
2
MRC Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, Cambridge CB1 9NL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 393; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020393
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 28 January 2020 / Accepted: 30 January 2020 / Published: 1 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Monitoring dietary intake of sugars in the population’s diet has great importance in evaluating the efficiency of national sugar reduction programmes. The study objective was to provide a comprehensive assessment of dietary sources of added and free sugars to assess adherence to public health recommendations in the UK population and to consider the impact of different sugar definitions on monitoring. The terms “added sugar” and “free sugar” are different sugar definitions which include different sugar components and may result in different sugar intakes depending on the definition. Dietary intake of added sugars, free sugars and seven individual sugar components (sugar from table sugar; other sugars; honey; fruit juice; fruit puree; dried fruit; and stewed fruit) of 2138 males and females (1.5–64 years) from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) 2014–2016, collected using a 4 day estimated food diary, were studied. Added and free sugar intake accounted for 7% to 13% of total energy intake respectively. Major sources of free sugar intake were “cereals and cereal products”, “non-alcoholic beverages”, and “sugars, preserves, confectionery”. Differences between added and free sugar intake were significantly large, and thus use of free sugar versus added sugar definitions need careful consideration for standardised monitoring of sugar intake in relation to public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugars; added sugars; free sugars; nutrition survey; UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey; dietary recommendations; public health; children; teenagers; adults sugars; added sugars; free sugars; nutrition survey; UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey; dietary recommendations; public health; children; teenagers; adults
MDPI and ACS Style

Amoutzopoulos, B.; Steer, T.; Roberts, C.; Collins, D.; Page, P. Free and Added Sugar Consumption and Adherence to Guidelines: The UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2014/15–2015/16). Nutrients 2020, 12, 393. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020393

AMA Style

Amoutzopoulos B, Steer T, Roberts C, Collins D, Page P. Free and Added Sugar Consumption and Adherence to Guidelines: The UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2014/15–2015/16). Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):393. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020393

Chicago/Turabian Style

Amoutzopoulos, Birdem, Toni Steer, Caireen Roberts, David Collins, and Polly Page. 2020. "Free and Added Sugar Consumption and Adherence to Guidelines: The UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2014/15–2015/16)" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 393. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020393

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop