Next Article in Journal
The Relationship between Circulating Acetate and Human Insulin Resistance before and after Weight Loss in the DiOGenes Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Australian and New Zealand Medical Students’ Attitudes and Confidence towards Providing Nutrition Care in Practice
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
Promoting Evidence Based Nutrition Education Across the World in a Competitive Space: Delivering a Massive Open Online Course
Article

Inflaming Public Interest: A Qualitative Study of Adult Learners’ Perceptions on Nutrition and Inflammation

Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Monash University, Level 1 264 Ferntree Gully Road, Notting Hill, VIC 3168, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 345; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020345
Received: 8 January 2020 / Revised: 23 January 2020 / Accepted: 26 January 2020 / Published: 28 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Education in Medicine)
Research suggests national dietary guidelines are losing public resonance, with consumers actively seeking alternate nutrition advice from unregulated online platforms that often propagate misinformation. Improved diet quality can beneficially affect inflammation, and with science relating to nutrition and inflammation also appealing to consumers, this emerging topic provides an opportunity to consider how novel engagement strategies can be used to increase public support of expert-generated advice. This study aimed to qualitatively explore MOOC learners’ perceptions and experiences of following diets believed to help manage inflammation. Data were collected from an evidence-based nutrition-focused Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), which included a unit titled Foods and Inflammation. The Framework method was used to analyze 12,622 learner comments, taken from the MOOC’s online discussion forum and questionnaire. Learners identified avoidance of core food groups, such as dairy and grains, as key in managing inflammation. Dietary advice came mainly from the internet, and health professionals reportedly lacked an appreciation of the learners’ underlying nutrition knowledge, providing oversimplified advice that did not satisfy their scientific curiosity. To help build consumer trust and increase engagement, health professionals need to consider innovative education strategies that utilize novel topics such as nutrition and inflammation, in a safe and accurate manner. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition education; nutrition misinformation; credibility; nutrition science nutrition education; nutrition misinformation; credibility; nutrition science
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Cowan, S.; Sood, S.; Truby, H.; Dordevic, A.; Adamski, M.; Gibson, S. Inflaming Public Interest: A Qualitative Study of Adult Learners’ Perceptions on Nutrition and Inflammation. Nutrients 2020, 12, 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020345

AMA Style

Cowan S, Sood S, Truby H, Dordevic A, Adamski M, Gibson S. Inflaming Public Interest: A Qualitative Study of Adult Learners’ Perceptions on Nutrition and Inflammation. Nutrients. 2020; 12(2):345. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020345

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cowan, Stephanie, Surbhi Sood, Helen Truby, Aimee Dordevic, Melissa Adamski, and Simone Gibson. 2020. "Inflaming Public Interest: A Qualitative Study of Adult Learners’ Perceptions on Nutrition and Inflammation" Nutrients 12, no. 2: 345. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020345

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop