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Open AccessArticle

Diet Quality Affects the Association between Census-Based Neighborhood Deprivation and All-Cause Mortality in Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study

1
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology and Shokuiku, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, Tokyo 162-8636, Japan
2
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan
3
Psychology and Behavior Sciences, Osaka Medical College, Osaka 569-0801, Japan
4
Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8577, Japan
5
Department of Public Health, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
6
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group is provided in the Acknowledgements.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092194
Received: 29 July 2019 / Revised: 3 September 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 12 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Guidelines and Nutritional Education)
Background: Individuals residing in more deprived areas with a lower diet quality might have a higher mortality risk. We aimed to examine the association between deprivation within an area and all-cause mortality risk according to diet quality. Methods: We conducted a population-based prospective study on 27,994 men and 33,273 women aged 45–75 years. Neighborhood deprivation was assessed using the Japanese areal deprivation index (ADI). Dietary intakes were assessed using a validated 147-item food frequency questionnaire. Results: Individuals residing in the most deprived area had the lowest dietary scores. During the 16.7-year follow-up, compared to individuals with a high quality diet residing in the least deprived area, individuals with a low quality diet had a higher risk of mortality according to increment of ADI (p trend = 0.03); the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 1.09 (0.999–1.19), 1.17 (1.08–1.27), and 1.19 (1.08–1.32) in those residing in the lowest through the highest third of ADI, respectively. However, individuals with a high quality diet had no significant association between ADI and mortality. Conclusion: A well-balanced diet may prevent early death associated with neighborhood socioeconomic status among those residing in highly deprived areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet quality; neighborhood deprivation; Japanese areal deprivation index; neighborhood socioeconomic status; hazard ratios; mortality; Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top; well-balanced diet; early death diet quality; neighborhood deprivation; Japanese areal deprivation index; neighborhood socioeconomic status; hazard ratios; mortality; Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top; well-balanced diet; early death
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Kurotani, K.; Honjo, K.; Nakaya, T.; Ikeda, A.; Mizoue, T.; Sawada, N.; Tsugane, S.; Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study Group. Diet Quality Affects the Association between Census-Based Neighborhood Deprivation and All-Cause Mortality in Japanese Men and Women: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2194.

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