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Open AccessArticle

Native Whey Induces Similar Adaptation to Strength Training as Milk, despite Higher Levels of Leucine, in Elderly Individuals

1
Department of Physical Performance, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, P.O. Box 4014 Ullevål Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway
2
Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, 0130 Oslo, Norway
3
Norwegian Olympic Federation, 0863 Oslo, Norway
4
Section of Anatomy, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, 0317 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2094; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092094
Received: 24 June 2019 / Revised: 5 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 4 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Intake and Muscle Mass)
Background: Large amounts of protein (40 g) or supplementing suboptimal servings of protein with leucine are able to overcome the anabolic resistance in elderly muscle. Our aim was to compare the effects of supplementation of native whey, high in leucine, with milk on gains in muscle mass and strength during a period of strength training, in elderly individuals. Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized, controlled study, a total of 30 healthy men and women received two daily servings of 20 g of either milk protein or native whey, during an 11-week strength training intervention. Muscle strength, lean mass, m. vastus lateralis thickness, muscle fiber area, and resting and post-exercise phosphorylation of p70S6K, 4E-BP1, and eEF-2 were assessed prior to and after the intervention period. Results: Muscle mass and strength increased, by all measures applied in both groups (p < 0.001), with no differences between groups (p > 0.25). p70S6K phosphorylation increased (~1000%, p < 0.045) 2 h after exercise in the untrained and trained state, with no differences between supplements. Total and phosphorylated mTORC-1 decreased after training. Conclusion: Supplementation with milk or native whey during an 11-week strength training period increased muscle mass and strength similarly in healthy elderly individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: protein supplementation; amino acids; protein quality; resistance exercise; gerontology; mTORC-1 protein supplementation; amino acids; protein quality; resistance exercise; gerontology; mTORC-1
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Hamarsland, H.; Johansen, M.K.; Seeberg, F.; Brochmann, M.; Garthe, I.; Benestad, H.B.; Raastad, T. Native Whey Induces Similar Adaptation to Strength Training as Milk, despite Higher Levels of Leucine, in Elderly Individuals. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2094.

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