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Temporal Trends in Apparent Food Consumption in Bangladesh: A Joinpoint Regression Analysis of FAO’s Food Balance Sheet Data from 1961 to 2013

1
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa 7610793, Japan
2
Department of Food Processing and Nutrition, Karnataka State Akkamahadevi Women’s University, Vijayapura, Karnataka 586108, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1864; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081864
Received: 17 July 2019 / Revised: 26 July 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 10 August 2019
We analyzed the temporal trends and significant changes in apparent food consumption or availabilityin Bangladesh from 1961 to 2013. Due to the lack of a long-term national dietary intake dataset, this study used data derived from the FAO’s food balance sheets. We used joinpoint regression analysis to identify significant changes in the temporal trends. The annual percent change (APC) was computed for each segment of the trends. Apparent intake of starchy roots, eggs, fish, vegetables, milk, and vegetable oils significantly has increased (p < 0.05) in the Bangladeshi diet since 1961; whereas cereals changed by merely 4.65%. Bangladesh has been experiencing three structural changes in their dietary history after the Liberation War, though the intake level has been grossly inadequate. Initially, since the late-1970s, apparent vegetable oils intake increased at a market rate (APC = 7.53). Subsequently, since the early-1990s, the real force behind the structural change in the diet has been the increasing trends in the apparent intake of fish (APC = 5.05), eggs (APC = 4.65), and meat (APC = 1.54). Lastly, since the early 2000s, apparent intakes of fruits (APC = 20.44), vegetables (APC = 10.58), and milk (APC = 3.55) increased significantly (p <0.05). This study result reveals and quantifies the significant secular changes in the dietary history of Bangladesh from 1961 to 2013. Bangladesh has experienced inadequate but significant structural changes in the diet in the late-1970s, early-1990s, and early-2000s. Overabundance of cereals and inadequate structural changes in the diet may have caused the increasing prevalence of overweightness and emergence of diet-related, non-communicable diseases in Bangladesh. View Full-Text
Keywords: apparent dietary intake; food balance sheet; joinpoint regression analysis apparent dietary intake; food balance sheet; joinpoint regression analysis
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Al Hasan, S.M.; Saulam, J.; Kanda, K.; Hirao, T. Temporal Trends in Apparent Food Consumption in Bangladesh: A Joinpoint Regression Analysis of FAO’s Food Balance Sheet Data from 1961 to 2013. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1864.

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