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Open AccessArticle

No Interaction between Polymorphisms Related to Vitamin A Metabolism and Vitamin A Intake in Relation to Colorectal Cancer in a Prospective Danish Cohort

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Focused Research Unit for Molecular Diagnostic and Clinical Research, Institute of Regional Health Research-Center Sønderjylland, Hospital of Southern Jutland, 6200 Aabenraa, Denmark
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Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark
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Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark
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Institute of Public Health, Unit of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Biodemography, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark
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Luxembourg Institute of Health, Department of Population Health, 1445 Strassen, Luxembourg
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Danish Cancer Society Research Center, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
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Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark
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National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
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The Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry, Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1428; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061428
Received: 24 May 2019 / Revised: 13 June 2019 / Accepted: 21 June 2019 / Published: 25 June 2019
Although vitamin A is essential for gut immune cell trafficking (paramount for the intestinal immune system), epidemiological studies on the role of vitamin A in colorectal cancer (CRC) aetiology are conflicting. By using functional polymorphisms, gene–environment (GxE) interaction analyses may identify the biological effects (or “mechanism of action”) of environmental factors on CRC aetiology. Potential interactions between dietary or supplemental vitamin A intake and genetic variation in the vitamin A metabolic pathway genes related to risk of CRC were studied. We used a nested case-cohort design within the Danish “Diet, Cancer and Health” cohort, with prospectively collected lifestyle information from 57,053 participants, and the Cox proportional hazard models and likelihood ratio test. No statistically significant associations between the selected polymorphisms and CRC, and no statistically significant interactions between vitamin A intake and the polymorphisms were found. In conclusion, no support of an involvement of vitamin A in CRC aetiology was found. View Full-Text
Keywords: gene-environment interaction; diet; immune system; candidate gene; pro-vitamin A-carotenoids; Vitamin A; retinol; Western-style diet gene-environment interaction; diet; immune system; candidate gene; pro-vitamin A-carotenoids; Vitamin A; retinol; Western-style diet
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Andersen, V.; Halekoh, U.; Bohn, T.; Tjønneland, A.; Vogel, U.; Kopp, T.I. No Interaction between Polymorphisms Related to Vitamin A Metabolism and Vitamin A Intake in Relation to Colorectal Cancer in a Prospective Danish Cohort. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1428.

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