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Assessment of Packaged Foods and Beverages Carrying Nutrition Marketing against Canada’s Food Guide Recommendations

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
2
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
4
School of Nutrition & Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods, Laval University, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020411
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 10 February 2019 / Accepted: 13 February 2019 / Published: 15 February 2019
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Abstract

Canadians’ food purchases consist largely of packaged processed and ultra-processed products, which typically fall outside the “core” foods recommended by Canada’s Food Guide (CFG). Almost half of packaged products in Canada carry nutrition marketing (i.e., nutrient content and health claims). This study assessed whether packaged foods carrying nutrition marketing align with recommendations outlined in the 2007 CFG. Label data (n = 9376) were extracted from the 2013 Food Label Information Program (FLIP). Label components (including nutrition marketing) were classified using the International Network for Food and Obesity/NCDs Research, Monitoring and Action Support (INFORMAS) labelling taxonomy. The Health Canada Surveillance Tool (HCST) was used to assess the alignment of products to CFG. Each food or beverage was classified into one of five groups (i.e., Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3, Tier 4, “Others”). Products in Tier 1, 2 or water were considered “in line with CFG”. Most products in the analyzed sample were classified as Tier 2 (35%) and Tier 3 (27%). Although foods with nutrition marketing were significantly more likely to align to CFG recommendations (p < 0.001), many products not “in line with CFG” still carried nutrition marketing. This study provides important baseline data that could be used upon the implementation of the new CFG. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary guidelines; Canada’s food guide; INFORMAS; health Canada surveillance tool; nutrition marketing; nutrient and health claims; food supply dietary guidelines; Canada’s food guide; INFORMAS; health Canada surveillance tool; nutrition marketing; nutrient and health claims; food supply
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Franco-Arellano, B.; Kim, M.A.; Vandevijvere, S.; Bernstein, J.T.; Labonté, M.-È.; Mulligan, C.; L’Abbé, M.R. Assessment of Packaged Foods and Beverages Carrying Nutrition Marketing against Canada’s Food Guide Recommendations. Nutrients 2019, 11, 411.

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