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Article

Time Trends in Age at Menarche and Related Non-Communicable Disease Risk during the 20th Century in Mexico

1
Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University and Research, 6708WE Wageningen, The Netherlands
2
Health Sciences Division, Universidad de Monterrey, San Pedro Garza García, N.L. 66238, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020394
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 5 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
Developed countries have shown a time trend towards a younger age at menarche (AAM), which is associated with increased risk of later obesity and non-communicable diseases. This study aimed to assess whether a time trend in AAM is associated with disease risk in Mexican women (n = 30,826), using data from the Mexican National Health Survey (2000). Linear and log binomial regression was used for nutritional and disease outcomes, while Welch–ANOVA was used to test for a time trend. AAM (in years) decreased over time (p < 0.001), with a maximal difference of 0.99 years between the 1920s (13.6 years) and 1980s (12.6 years ). AAM was negatively associated with weight (β = −1.01 kg; 95% CI −1.006, −1.004) and body mass index (BMI) (β = −1.01 kg/m2; −1.007, −1.006), and positively with height (β = 0.18 cm; 0.112, 0.231). AAM was associated with diabetes (RR = 0.95; 0.93, 0.98) and hypercholesterolemia (RR = 0.93; 0.90, 0.95), but not with hypertension, breast cancer or arthritis. In Mexico, AAM decreased significantly during the 20th century. AAM was inversely associated with adult weight and BMI, and positively with height. Women with a later AAM had a lower risk of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. View Full-Text
Keywords: menarche; body mass index; height; diabetes mellitus; non-communicable disease menarche; body mass index; height; diabetes mellitus; non-communicable disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Petersohn, I.; Zarate-Ortiz, A.G.; Cepeda-Lopez, A.C.; Melse-Boonstra, A. Time Trends in Age at Menarche and Related Non-Communicable Disease Risk during the 20th Century in Mexico. Nutrients 2019, 11, 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020394

AMA Style

Petersohn I, Zarate-Ortiz AG, Cepeda-Lopez AC, Melse-Boonstra A. Time Trends in Age at Menarche and Related Non-Communicable Disease Risk during the 20th Century in Mexico. Nutrients. 2019; 11(2):394. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020394

Chicago/Turabian Style

Petersohn, Inga, Arli G. Zarate-Ortiz, Ana C. Cepeda-Lopez, and Alida Melse-Boonstra. 2019. "Time Trends in Age at Menarche and Related Non-Communicable Disease Risk during the 20th Century in Mexico" Nutrients 11, no. 2: 394. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020394

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