Next Article in Journal
Association between Lower Intake of Minerals and Depressive Symptoms among Elderly Japanese Women but Not Men: Findings from Shika Study
Previous Article in Journal
A Systematic Review of the Association of Skipping Breakfast with Weight and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents. What Should We Better Investigate in the Future?
Article

Salt Preference and Ability to Discriminate between Salt Content of Two Commercially Available Products of Australian Primary Schoolchildren

1
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Waurn Ponds, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia
2
Centre for Advanced Sensory Science (CASS), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 1 Geringhap Street, Geelong 3220, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 388; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020388
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 8 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
Australian children consume too much salt, primarily from processed foods where salt is often used to enhance flavour. Few studies have assessed children’s salt preference in commercially available foods. This study aims to assess (1) children’s preference and ability to discriminate between salt levels in two commercially available foods and (2) if preference or ability to discriminate between salt levels changes after an education program. Chips and corn flakes were tasted at three levels of salt concentration. Children ranked which they liked best (preference) and which was saltiest (ability to discriminate). The proportion of children across categorical responses was assessed (Chi squared and McNemar’s test) together with changes in preference and ability to discriminate between salt levels from timepoint 1 (T1) to timepoint 2 (T2). Ninety-two children (57% female, mean age 9.1 years (SD 0.8)) participated. At T1 approximately one-half and two-thirds of children preferred the highest salt chip and cornflake, respectively, (both p < 0.05). Fifty-seven percent and 63% of children identified the highest level of salt in chips and cornflakes as the saltiest, respectively. Preference and ability to discriminate between salt levels were unchanged between timepoints. Results support product reformulation to decrease salt content of foods provided to children. View Full-Text
Keywords: salt; taste; food preference; children salt; taste; food preference; children
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

West, M.; Liem, D.G.; Booth, A.; Nowson, C.; Grimes, C. Salt Preference and Ability to Discriminate between Salt Content of Two Commercially Available Products of Australian Primary Schoolchildren. Nutrients 2019, 11, 388. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020388

AMA Style

West M, Liem DG, Booth A, Nowson C, Grimes C. Salt Preference and Ability to Discriminate between Salt Content of Two Commercially Available Products of Australian Primary Schoolchildren. Nutrients. 2019; 11(2):388. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020388

Chicago/Turabian Style

West, Madeline, Djin G. Liem, Alison Booth, Caryl Nowson, and Carley Grimes. 2019. "Salt Preference and Ability to Discriminate between Salt Content of Two Commercially Available Products of Australian Primary Schoolchildren" Nutrients 11, no. 2: 388. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020388

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop