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Impaired Glucose Tolerance is Associated with Enhanced Platelet-Monocyte Aggregation in Short-Term High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

1
School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences (SLMMS), College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000, South Africa
2
Biomedical Research and Innovation Platform (BRIP), South African Medical Research Council, Tygerberg 7505, South Africa
3
Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, 60131 Ancona, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2695; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112695
Received: 5 October 2019 / Revised: 2 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 7 November 2019
High-fat diet (HFD) feeding is known to induce metabolic dysregulation, however, less is known on its impact in promoting the hypercoagulable state. This current study aimed to evaluate platelet-monocyte aggregate (PMA) formation following short-term HFD feeding. This is particularly important for understanding the link between inflammation and the hypercoagulable state during the early onset of metabolic dysregulation. To explore such a hypothesis, mice were fed a HFD for 8 weeks, with body weights as well as insulin and blood glucose levels monitored on a weekly basis during this period. Basal hematological measurements were determined and the levels of spontaneous peripheral blood PMAs were assessed using whole blood flow cytometry. The results showed that although there were no significant differences in body weights, mice on HFD displayed impaired glucose tolerance and markedly raised insulin levels. These metabolic abnormalities were accompanied by elevated baseline PMA levels as an indication of hypercoagulation. Importantly, it was evident that baseline levels of monocytes, measured using the CD14 monocyte marker, were significantly decreased in HFD-fed mice when compared to controls. In summary, the current evidence shows that in addition to causing glucose intolerance, such as that identified in a prediabetic state, HFD-feeding can promote undesirable hypercoagulation, the major consequence implicated in the development of cardiovascular complications. View Full-Text
Keywords: high fat diet; metabolic dysregulation; platelets; monocytes; hypercoagulation; inflammation high fat diet; metabolic dysregulation; platelets; monocytes; hypercoagulation; inflammation
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Mkandla, Z.; Mutize, T.; Dludla, P.V.; Nkambule, B.B. Impaired Glucose Tolerance is Associated with Enhanced Platelet-Monocyte Aggregation in Short-Term High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2695.

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