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Open AccessArticle

Dietary Habits Had No Relationship with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Analysis Utilizing Quantitative Data about Dietary Intakes

1
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Medicine, Toho University, 5-21-16, Omori-Nishi, Ota-ku, Tokyo 143-8540, Japan
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kitasato University, 1-15-1, Kitasato, Minami, Sagamihara 252-0375, Japan
3
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seirei Sakura Citizen Hospital, 2-36-2, Eharadai, Sakura-ku, Chiba 285-0825, Japan
4
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, the Jikei University School of Medicine, 3-19-18, Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003, Japan
5
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fujita Health University, 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Toyoake 470-1192, Japan
6
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, 35, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
7
The Tokyo Health Service Association, 1-2, Sunatoharacho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0842, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102327
Received: 27 June 2019 / Revised: 13 August 2019 / Accepted: 24 September 2019 / Published: 1 October 2019
Although several genetic and environmental factors have been identified as risk factors of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), the influence of dietary intake has not been elucidated. We evaluated the association between AIS and dietary habits among female students. Junior high school girls aged 12 to 15 years in the Tokyo metropolitan area who underwent a second school screening for scoliosis were recruited. AIS was diagnosed by orthopedic surgeons specializing in scoliosis, using standing whole spine radiography. Students with a Cobb angle of ≥15° were classified into the AIS group, and others were considered healthy controls. Dietary assessment was performed using a validated diet history questionnaire. Dietary intakes were categorized into quintiles based on distribution, and crude and multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for AIS for each quintile category of dietary variable were calculated, with the lowest quintile category used as a reference. In total, 2431 subjects were included in the analysis, and 47.8% of them were diagnosed with AIS. None of the selected nutrients or food groups was significantly associated with AIS. In conclusion, dietary habits may not be associated with AIS. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; Cobb angle; dietary habits; nutrient; food; junior high school girls adolescent idiopathic scoliosis; Cobb angle; dietary habits; nutrient; food; junior high school girls
MDPI and ACS Style

Asakura, K.; Michikawa, T.; Takaso, M.; Minami, S.; Soshi, S.; Tsuji, T.; Okada, E.; Abe, K.; Takahashi, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Nishiwaki, Y.; Watanabe, K. Dietary Habits Had No Relationship with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: Analysis Utilizing Quantitative Data about Dietary Intakes. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2327.

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