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Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 934; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070934

Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Singapore 117599, Singapore
2
Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore
3
Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117596, Singapore
Contributed equally to this work.
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract

Spices that are rich in polyphenols are metabolized to a convergent group of phenolic/aromatic acids. We conducted a dose-exposure nutrikinetic study to investigate associations between mixed spices intake and plasma concentrations of selected, unconjugated phenolic/aromatic acids. In a randomized crossover study, 17 Chinese males consumed a curry meal containing 0 g, 6 g, and 12 g of mixed spices. Postprandial blood was drawn up to 7 h at regular intervals and plasma phenolic/aromatic acids were quantified via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cinnamic acid (CNA, p < 0.0001) and phenylacetic acid (PAA, p < 0.0005) concentrations were significantly increased with mixed spices consumption, although none of the other measured phenolic/aromatic acids differ significantly between treatments. CNA displayed a high dose-exposure association (R2 > 0.8, p < 0.0001). The adjusted mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve until 7 h (AUC0–7 h) for CNA during the 3 increasing doses were 8.4 ± 3.4, 376.1 ± 104.7 and 875.7 ± 291.9 nM.h respectively. Plasma CNA concentration may be used as a biomarker of spice intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: spices; polyphenols; phenolic/aromatic acids; metabolites; nutrikinetics spices; polyphenols; phenolic/aromatic acids; metabolites; nutrikinetics
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Haldar, S.; Lee, S.H.; Tan, J.J.; Chia, S.C.; Henry, C.J.; Chan, E.C.Y. Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 934.

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