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Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Singapore 117599, Singapore
2
Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore
3
Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117596, Singapore
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 934; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070934
Received: 25 June 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 18 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
Spices that are rich in polyphenols are metabolized to a convergent group of phenolic/aromatic acids. We conducted a dose-exposure nutrikinetic study to investigate associations between mixed spices intake and plasma concentrations of selected, unconjugated phenolic/aromatic acids. In a randomized crossover study, 17 Chinese males consumed a curry meal containing 0 g, 6 g, and 12 g of mixed spices. Postprandial blood was drawn up to 7 h at regular intervals and plasma phenolic/aromatic acids were quantified via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cinnamic acid (CNA, p < 0.0001) and phenylacetic acid (PAA, p < 0.0005) concentrations were significantly increased with mixed spices consumption, although none of the other measured phenolic/aromatic acids differ significantly between treatments. CNA displayed a high dose-exposure association (R2 > 0.8, p < 0.0001). The adjusted mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve until 7 h (AUC0–7 h) for CNA during the 3 increasing doses were 8.4 ± 3.4, 376.1 ± 104.7 and 875.7 ± 291.9 nM.h respectively. Plasma CNA concentration may be used as a biomarker of spice intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: spices; polyphenols; phenolic/aromatic acids; metabolites; nutrikinetics spices; polyphenols; phenolic/aromatic acids; metabolites; nutrikinetics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Haldar, S.; Lee, S.H.; Tan, J.J.; Chia, S.C.; Henry, C.J.; Chan, E.C.Y. Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 934. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070934

AMA Style

Haldar S, Lee SH, Tan JJ, Chia SC, Henry CJ, Chan ECY. Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study. Nutrients. 2018; 10(7):934. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070934

Chicago/Turabian Style

Haldar, Sumanto, Sze H. Lee, Jun J. Tan, Siok C. Chia, Christiani J. Henry, and Eric C.Y. Chan. 2018. "Dose-Dependent Increase in Unconjugated Cinnamic Acid Concentration in Plasma Following Acute Consumption of Polyphenol Rich Curry in the Polyspice Study" Nutrients 10, no. 7: 934. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070934

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