Next Article in Journal
A Pilot Randomized Trial of Oral Magnesium Supplementation on Supraventricular Arrhythmias
Next Article in Special Issue
An Active Lifestyle Reinforces the Effect of a Healthy Diet on Cognitive Function: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study
Previous Article in Journal
Chrysin Inhibits Advanced Glycation End Products-Induced Kidney Fibrosis in Renal Mesangial Cells and Diabetic Kidneys
Previous Article in Special Issue
Early Life Vitamin C Deficiency Does Not Alter Morphology of Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons or Markers of Synaptic Plasticity in a Guinea Pig Model
Open AccessArticle

Oxidative Stress Levels in the Brain Are Determined by Post-Mortem Interval and Ante-Mortem Vitamin C State but Not Alzheimer’s Disease Status

1
Undergraduate Program in Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
2
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
3
Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 883; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070883
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 27 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle Strategies in Cognitive Decline: Focus on Nutrition)
The current study highlighted several changes in measures of oxidative stress and antioxidant status that take place in the mouse brain over the course of 24 h post-mortem. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and glutathione both decreased significantly in cortex in as little as 2 h and malondialdehyde levels increased. Further change from baseline was observed up to 24 h, including carbonyl and sulfhydryl formation. The greatest changes were observed in brains that began with low ascorbic acid levels (gulo−/− mice) compared to wild-type or 5XFAD mice. Cortical samples from nine Alzheimer’s Disease cases and five controls were also assayed under the same conditions. Post mortem intervals ranged from 6 to 47 h and all samples had low ascorbic acid levels at time of measurement. Malondialdehyde levels were lower in Alzheimer’s Disease cases. Despite a strong positive correlation between ascorbic acid and glutathione levels, no other correlations among oxidative stress measures or post mortem interval were observed. Together the data suggest that molecular changes occurring within the first hours of death may mask differences between patient groups. Care must be taken interpreting studies in human brain tissue where ante-mortem nutrient status is not known to avoid bias or confounding of results. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress; vitamin C; Alzheimer’s Disease; brain; post mortem interval oxidative stress; vitamin C; Alzheimer’s Disease; brain; post mortem interval
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Eckman, J.; Dixit, S.; Nackenoff, A.; Schrag, M.; Harrison, F.E. Oxidative Stress Levels in the Brain Are Determined by Post-Mortem Interval and Ante-Mortem Vitamin C State but Not Alzheimer’s Disease Status. Nutrients 2018, 10, 883.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop