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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Commercially Available Sugar-Sweetened Beverages on Subjective Appetite and Short-Term Food Intake in Girls

1
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, 166 Bedford Highway, Halifax, NS B3M 2J6, Canada
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Faculty of Kinesiology & Health Studies, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
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School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
4
Department of Chemistry & Biology, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040394
Received: 1 March 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
Background: The effect of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on satiety and short-term food intake (FI) regulation in girls has received little attention. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of pre-meal consumption of commercially available SSBs on subjective appetite and short-term FI in 9–14-year-old girls. The methods we used include using a randomized crossover design in which 28 girls consumed isovolumetric amounts (350 mL) of a fruit drink (154 kcal), cola (158 kcal), 1% chocolate milk (224 kcal), or water (control; 0 kcal) on four separate mornings. Subjective appetite and thirst were measured at regular intervals via visual analogue scales (VAS) and FI was assessed at 60 min post-beverage consumption. The results show that subjective appetite and thirst decreased after all beverages, but did not differ among beverages. Short-term FI was suppressed following consumption of chocolate milk (15%; p < 0.001) and cola (11%; p = 0.02) compared to the water control. However, cumulative energy intake (beverage (kcal) + test meal (kcal)) was not affected by beverage type. In conclusion, chocolate milk and cola, but not fruit drink, suppressed FI in girls while cumulative FI did not differ among treatments. View Full-Text
Keywords: girls; food intake; appetite; sugars; cola; chocolate milk; fruit drink girls; food intake; appetite; sugars; cola; chocolate milk; fruit drink
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Bennett, L.J.; Totosy de Zepetnek, J.O.; Brett, N.R.; Poirier, K.; Guo, Q.; Rousseau, D.; Bellissimo, N. Effect of Commercially Available Sugar-Sweetened Beverages on Subjective Appetite and Short-Term Food Intake in Girls. Nutrients 2018, 10, 394.

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