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Body Mass Index is Strongly Associated with Hypertension: Results from the Longevity Check-Up 7+ Study

1
Fondazione Policlinico Universitario “Agostino Gemelli”, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, L.go F. Vito 8, 00168 Rome, Italy
2
Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, Università dell’Aquila, Via G. Petrini, Edificio Delta 6, 67100 Coppito (AQ), Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1976; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121976
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 11 December 2018 / Accepted: 12 December 2018 / Published: 13 December 2018
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Abstract

The present study was undertaken to provide a better insight into the relationship between different levels of body mass index (BMI) and changing risk for hypertension, using an unselected sample of participants assessed during the Longevity Check-up 7+ (Lookup 7+) project. Lookup 7+ is an ongoing cross-sectional survey started in June 2015 and conducted in unconventional settings (i.e., exhibitions, malls, and health promotion campaigns) across Italy. Candidate participants are eligible for enrolment if they are at least 18 years of age and provide written informed consent. Specific health metrics are assessed through a brief questionnaire and direct measurement of standing height, body weight, blood glucose, total blood cholesterol, and blood pressure. The present analyses were conducted in 7907 community-living adults. According to the BMI cutoffs recommended by the World Health Organization, overweight status was observed among 2896 (38%) participants; the obesity status was identified in 1135 participants (15%), with 893 (11.8%) participants in class I, 186 (2.5%) in class II, and 56 (0.7%) in class III. Among enrollees with a normal BMI, the prevalence of hypertension was 45% compared with 67% among overweight participants, 79% in obesity class I and II, and up to 87% among participants with obesity class III (p for trend < 0.001). After adjusting for age, significantly different distributions of systolic and diastolic blood pressure across BMI levels were consistent. Overall, the average systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly and linearly across BMI levels. In conclusion, we found a gradient of increasing blood pressure with higher levels of BMI. The fact that this gradient is present even in the fully adjusted analyses suggests that BMI may cause a direct effect on blood pressure, independent of other clinical risk factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: body mass index; obesity; hypertension body mass index; obesity; hypertension
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Landi, F.; Calvani, R.; Picca, A.; Tosato, M.; Martone, A.M.; Ortolani, E.; Sisto, A.; D’Angelo, E.; Serafini, E.; Desideri, G.; Fuga, M.T.; Marzetti, E. Body Mass Index is Strongly Associated with Hypertension: Results from the Longevity Check-Up 7+ Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1976.

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