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Global Positioning System (GPS) Scintillation Associated with a Polar Cap Patch

1
Physics Department, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3, Canada
2
Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai 264209, China
3
Space Environment and Radio Engineering Group (SERENE), School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chung-Yen Kuo
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(10), 1915; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13101915
Received: 26 April 2021 / Revised: 11 May 2021 / Accepted: 12 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Ionospheric Studies over Polar Areas)
A Global Positioning System (GPS) network in the polar cap, along with ionosonde and SuperDARN radar measurements, are used to study GPS signal amplitude and phase scintillation associated with a polar cap patch. The patch was formed due to a north-to-south transition of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz). The patch moved antisunward with an average speed of ~600 m/s and lasted for ~2 h. Significant scintillation occurred on the leading edge of the patch, with smaller bursts of scintillation inside and on the trailing edge. As the patch moved, it maintained the integrity of the scintillation, producing irregularities (Fresnel scale) on the leading edge. There were no convection shears or changes in the direction of convection during scintillation events. Observations suggest that scintillation-producing Fresnel scale structures are generated through the non-linear evolution of the gradient drift instability mechanism. View Full-Text
Keywords: polar cap ionosphere; plasma irregularities; ionospheric scintillation; solar-terrestrial interaction; GNSS technology polar cap ionosphere; plasma irregularities; ionospheric scintillation; solar-terrestrial interaction; GNSS technology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Thayyil, J.P.; McCaffrey, A.M.; Wang, Y.; Themens, D.R.; Watson, C.; Reid, B.; Zhang, Q.; Xing, Z. Global Positioning System (GPS) Scintillation Associated with a Polar Cap Patch. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 1915. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13101915

AMA Style

Thayyil JP, McCaffrey AM, Wang Y, Themens DR, Watson C, Reid B, Zhang Q, Xing Z. Global Positioning System (GPS) Scintillation Associated with a Polar Cap Patch. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(10):1915. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13101915

Chicago/Turabian Style

Thayyil, Jayachandran P., Anthony M. McCaffrey, Yong Wang, David R. Themens, Christopher Watson, Benjamin Reid, Qinghe Zhang, and Zanyang Xing. 2021. "Global Positioning System (GPS) Scintillation Associated with a Polar Cap Patch" Remote Sensing 13, no. 10: 1915. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13101915

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