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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Using Satellite Interferometry to Infer Landslide Sliding Surface Depth and Geometry

1
Department of Earth Science, Università degli Studi di Firenze, via La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze, Italy
2
Department of Earth Science, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Area Edilizia, Piazza Indipendenza 8, 50121 Firenze, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(9), 1462; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12091462
Received: 1 April 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 30 April 2020 / Published: 5 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing for Disaster Risk Management)
Information regarding the shape and depth of a landslide sliding surface (LSS) is fundamental for the estimation of the volume of the unstable masses, which in turn is of primary importance for the assessment of landslide magnitude and risk scenarios as well as in refining stability analyses. To assess an LSS is not an easy task and is generally time-consuming and expensive. In this work, a method existing in the literature, based on the inclination of movement vectors along a cross-section to estimate the depth and geometry LSSs, is used for the first time while exploiting satellite interferometric data. Given the advent of satellite interferometric data and the related increasing availability of spatially dense and accurate measurements, we test the effectiveness of this method—here named the vector inclination method (VIM)—to four case landslides located in Italy characterized by different types of movement, kinematics and volume. Geotechnical and geophysical information of the LSS is used to validate the method. Our results show that each of the presented cases provides useful insight into the validity of VIM using satellite interferometric data. The main advantages of VIM applied to satellite interferometry are that it enables estimation of the LSS with a theoretical worldwide coverage, as well as with no need for onsite instrumentation or even direct access; however, a good density of measurement points in both ascending and descending geometry is necessary. The combined use of VIM and traditional investigations can provide a more accurate LSS model. View Full-Text
Keywords: slope stability; slip surface; radar interferometry; vector inclination method slope stability; slip surface; radar interferometry; vector inclination method
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MDPI and ACS Style

Intrieri, E.; Frodella, W.; Raspini, F.; Bardi, F.; Tofani, V. Using Satellite Interferometry to Infer Landslide Sliding Surface Depth and Geometry. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 1462.

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