Next Article in Journal
Constructing a New Inter-Calibration Method for DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light
Previous Article in Journal
Modeling and Prediction of Regular Ionospheric Variations and Deterministic Anomalies
Open AccessLetter

Seismic Impact of Large Earthquakes on Estimating Global Mean Ocean Mass Change from GRACE

by Lu Tang 1,2, Jin Li 2,3,*, Jianli Chen 4, Song-Yun Wang 2, Rui Wang 1 and Xiaogong Hu 2,5
1
School of Communication and Information Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China
2
Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030, China
3
School of Astronomy and Space Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4
Center for Space Research, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78759, USA
5
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Space Navigation and Positing Techniques, Shanghai 200030, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(6), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060935
Received: 10 January 2020 / Revised: 5 March 2020 / Accepted: 11 March 2020 / Published: 13 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing of the Water Cycle)
We analyze the impact of large earthquakes on the estimation of the global mean ocean mass (GMOM) change rate over the 13-year period (January 2003 to December 2015) using the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Release-06 (RL06) monthly gravity solutions released by the Center for Space Research (CSR). We take into account the effects of the December 2004 Mw9.1 and April 2012 Mw8.6 Sumatra earthquakes, the March 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, and the February 2010 Mw8.8 Chile earthquake. After removing the co- and post-seismic effects of these earthquakes in the oceanic areas by least squares fitting, we estimate the GMOM rate from GRACE monthly observations. Results show that GRACE-observed GMOM rate before the seismic correction is 2.12 ± 0.30 mm/year, while after correction the rate is 2.05 ± 0.30 mm/year. Even though the −0.07 ± 0.02 mm/year seismic influence on GRACE GMOM rate is small on a global scale, it is a systematic bias and should be considered for improved quantification and understanding of the global sea level change. View Full-Text
Keywords: GRACE; global mean ocean mass change; large earthquakes; seismic deformation GRACE; global mean ocean mass change; large earthquakes; seismic deformation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tang, L.; Li, J.; Chen, J.; Wang, S.-Y.; Wang, R.; Hu, X. Seismic Impact of Large Earthquakes on Estimating Global Mean Ocean Mass Change from GRACE. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 935.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop