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Open AccessArticle

Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval from the First Korean Geostationary Satellite COMS Data: Validation and Error Assessment

1
Department of Science Education, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Department of Earth Science Education/Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea
3
Global Science and Technology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS), College Park, MD 20740, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(12), 1916; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10121916
Received: 24 October 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 30 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Ocean Remote Sensing)
Korea’s first geostationary satellite, the “Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite” (COMS), has been operating since 2010. The Meteorological Imager (MI), an sensor on-board the COMS, has observed sea-surface radiances for the estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) in the western Pacific Ocean and eastern Indian Ocean. To derive the SST coefficients of COMS, quality-controlled surface drifting buoy data were collected for the period of April 2011 to March 2015. A collocation procedure between COMS/MI data and the surface drifter data produced a matchup database for 4 years from 2011 to 2015. The coefficients for the COMS/MI SST were derived by applying appropriate algorithms, i.e., the Multi-channel SST (MCSST) and Non-linear SST (NLSST) algorithms, for daytime and nighttime data using a regression method. Validation results suggest the possibility of the continuous use of the coefficients as representative SST coefficients of COMS. The estimated SSTs near the edge of a full disk with high satellite zenith angles over 60° revealed relatively large errors compared to drifter temperatures. Most of NLSST formulations exhibited overestimation of SSTs at low SSTs (<10 °C). This study suggests an approach by which SST can be measured accurately in order to contribute to tracking climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: sea surface temperature (SST); COMS/MI; MCSST; NLSST; SST coefficients sea surface temperature (SST); COMS/MI; MCSST; NLSST; SST coefficients
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MDPI and ACS Style

Woo, H.-J.; Park, K.-A.; Li, X.; Lee, E.-Y. Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval from the First Korean Geostationary Satellite COMS Data: Validation and Error Assessment. Remote Sens. 2018, 10, 1916.

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