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Article

Reducing the Cooling Loads of Buildings Using Shading Devices: A Case Study in Darwin

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Faculty of Civil Engineering and Built Environment, University Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Parit Raja 86400, Malaysia
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College of Engineering and Science, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 8001, Australia
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Institute for Sustainable Industries & Liveable Cities, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC 8001, Australia
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College of Engineering, IT & Environment, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0810, Australia
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Energy and Resources Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0810, Australia
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Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia, Seri Iskandar 31750, Malaysia
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Faculty of Engineering, University Putra Malaysia, Seri Kembangan 43400, Malaysia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Paulo Santos and Luigi Aldieri
Sustainability 2022, 14(7), 3775; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14073775
Received: 5 February 2022 / Revised: 16 March 2022 / Accepted: 19 March 2022 / Published: 23 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Approaches to Reduce Building Energy Consumptions)
It is estimated that almost 40% of the world’s energy is consumed by buildings’ heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. This consumption increases by 3% every year and will reach 70% by 2050 due to rapid urbanisation and population growth. In Darwin, building energy consumption is even higher and accounts for up to 55% due to the hot and humid weather conditions. Singapore has the same weather conditions but less energy consumption, with only 38% compared to Darwin. Solar radiation can be defined as electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Sun and the Darwin area receives a large amount of solar radiation; building energy consumption can be reduced hugely if this radiation is blocked effectively by analysing appropriate shading devices. This study investigated the influence of different types of shading devices on the cooling load of a town hall building located in Darwin, Australia, and proposed the optimal shading device. The results showed that the horizontal fins led to a 5% reduction in the cooling load of the building. In contrast, adding a variation to the device angles and length increased the savings to 8%. The results demonstrated that the overhangs were more efficient than the fins, contributing 9.2% energy savings, and the cooling reduction savings were increased to 15.5% with design and length variations. View Full-Text
Keywords: building energy modeling (Revit); building energy efficiency; cooling load; solar shading devices building energy modeling (Revit); building energy efficiency; cooling load; solar shading devices
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mohammed, A.; Tariq, M.A.U.R.; Ng, A.W.M.; Zaheer, Z.; Sadeq, S.; Mohammed, M.; Mehdizadeh-Rad, H. Reducing the Cooling Loads of Buildings Using Shading Devices: A Case Study in Darwin. Sustainability 2022, 14, 3775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14073775

AMA Style

Mohammed A, Tariq MAUR, Ng AWM, Zaheer Z, Sadeq S, Mohammed M, Mehdizadeh-Rad H. Reducing the Cooling Loads of Buildings Using Shading Devices: A Case Study in Darwin. Sustainability. 2022; 14(7):3775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14073775

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mohammed, Aiman, Muhammad Atiq Ur Rehman Tariq, Anne Wai Man Ng, Zeeshan Zaheer, Safwan Sadeq, Mahmood Mohammed, and Hooman Mehdizadeh-Rad. 2022. "Reducing the Cooling Loads of Buildings Using Shading Devices: A Case Study in Darwin" Sustainability 14, no. 7: 3775. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14073775

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