Next Article in Journal
Mathematical Modeling of the Dynamic Temperature Profile in Geothermal-Energy-Heated Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs
Previous Article in Journal
Chloride Penetration Behavior of Concrete Made from Various Types of Recycled Concrete Aggregate
 
 
Article

Consumers’ and Stakeholders’ Acceptance of Indoor Agritecture in Shanghai (China)

1
CCST—Center for Cultural Studies on Science and Technology in China, Technische Universität Berlin, Kaiserin-Augusta-Allee 104-106, 10553 Berlin, Germany
2
CMS—Center for Metropolitan Studies, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 16-18, 10623 Berlin, Germany
3
ILS—Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development, Brüderweg 22-24, 44135 Dortmund, Germany
4
Department of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany
5
College of Natural Science, Michigan State University, 288 Farm Lane, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luca Salvati
Sustainability 2022, 14(5), 2771; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052771
Received: 9 December 2021 / Revised: 17 February 2022 / Accepted: 23 February 2022 / Published: 26 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Sustainable Urban and Rural Development)
During recent decades, there has been increasing awareness of the development of “agritecture” (“agri”culture + archi“tecture”) as a means to transform and revolutionize the food supply of future cities. The different forms of agritecture include building-integrated agricultural concepts such as vertical farms or indoor farms. In this way, urban food production could take place in proximity to consumers while employing so-called “urban waste” products (such as wastewater, waste heat, and organic waste) as valuable production inputs. Although scholars frequently highlight the potential of vertical farming and other agritecture approaches for Asian megacities, there is still a lack of academic research and completed projects related to this field in China. This study uses a mixed-methods approach, combining quantitative and qualitative research in the study location of Shanghai, to reveal the social acceptance of indoor agritecture among consumers and experts. First, to explore the perceptions of consumers, a survey of 713 potential consumers was conducted in Shanghai. Second, these surveys were complemented by 20 expert interviews with academics and practitioners from Shanghai to frame the quantitative research results. Our results revealed that the surveyed consumers’ social acceptance of indoor agritecture and the expectations of the experts are high. Additionally, there is already a high level of demand and a potential market for indoor agritecture in Shanghai. This has been confirmed by the ongoing construction of the first moderate-scale vertical farm and several indoor farms, in combination with the increasing existence of edible landscape approaches and rooftop farms. This development can be viewed as the rise of urban agritecture in Shanghai. The interviews revealed that experts raise more doubts about the economic dimension, whereas its social and ecological dimensions and the contextual framework of indoor agritecture are considered to be positive. View Full-Text
Keywords: acceptability; perception; urban agritecture; urban farm; vertical farm; social acceptance; indoor farm; urban agriculture acceptability; perception; urban agritecture; urban farm; vertical farm; social acceptance; indoor farm; urban agriculture
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Zhou, H.; Specht, K.; Kirby, C.K. Consumers’ and Stakeholders’ Acceptance of Indoor Agritecture in Shanghai (China). Sustainability 2022, 14, 2771. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052771

AMA Style

Zhou H, Specht K, Kirby CK. Consumers’ and Stakeholders’ Acceptance of Indoor Agritecture in Shanghai (China). Sustainability. 2022; 14(5):2771. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052771

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhou, Hemeng, Kathrin Specht, and Caitlin K. Kirby. 2022. "Consumers’ and Stakeholders’ Acceptance of Indoor Agritecture in Shanghai (China)" Sustainability 14, no. 5: 2771. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14052771

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop