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Article

Composite Soil Made of Rubber Fibers from Waste Tires, Blended Sugar Cane Molasses, and Kaolin Clay

1
Composites Laboratory, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Medellín 050010, Colombia
2
Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro 28013-602, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Syed Minhaj Saleem Kazmi
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042239
Received: 18 January 2022 / Revised: 8 February 2022 / Accepted: 11 February 2022 / Published: 16 February 2022
The use of different chemical and biological admixtures to improve the ground conditions has been a common practice in geotechnical engineering for decades. The use of waste material in these mixtures has received increasing attention in the recent years. This investigation evaluates the effects of using recycled tire polymer fibers (RTPF) and sugar molasses mixed with kaolin clay on the engineering properties of the soil. RTPF were obtained from a tire recycling company, while the molasses were extracted from a sugar cane manufacturer, both located in Colombia. RTPF is a waste and therefore its utilization is the first positive impact of this research, a green solution for this byproduct. Treated kaolin clay is widely used in many industrial processes, such as concrete, paper, paint, and traditional ceramics. The characterization was conducted with scanning electron microscopy, compression strength, particle-size distribution, x-ray diffraction, compressive and density tests. The results showed that the unconfined compressive strength improved from about 1.42 MPa for unstabilized samples, to 2.04 MPa for samples with 0.1 wt% of fibers, and 2.0 wt% molasses with respect to the dry weight of the soil. Furthermore, it was observed that soil microorganisms developed in some of the samples due to the organic nature of the molasses. View Full-Text
Keywords: waste tires; molasses; soil improving waste tires; molasses; soil improving
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiménez, J.E.; Fontes Vieira, C.M.; Colorado, H.A. Composite Soil Made of Rubber Fibers from Waste Tires, Blended Sugar Cane Molasses, and Kaolin Clay. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042239

AMA Style

Jiménez JE, Fontes Vieira CM, Colorado HA. Composite Soil Made of Rubber Fibers from Waste Tires, Blended Sugar Cane Molasses, and Kaolin Clay. Sustainability. 2022; 14(4):2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042239

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiménez, Juan E., Carlos M. Fontes Vieira, and Henry A. Colorado. 2022. "Composite Soil Made of Rubber Fibers from Waste Tires, Blended Sugar Cane Molasses, and Kaolin Clay" Sustainability 14, no. 4: 2239. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042239

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