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Article

Efficient Plant Types and Coverage Rates for Optimal Green Roof to Reduce Urban Heat Island Effect

1
Department of Forestry & Landscape Architecture, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Korea
2
Rural Environment & Resource Division, National Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Jeonju 54875, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Antonio Caggiano
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2146; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042146
Received: 24 January 2022 / Revised: 11 February 2022 / Accepted: 11 February 2022 / Published: 14 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Infrastructure and Resilient Stream Ecosystems)
Green roofs are implemented to reduce the urban heat island effect; however, studies are limited to comparing the reduction in urban heat island effect before and after implementation, and the focus is on the structural stability of the building rather than urban heat island reduction. In this study, using the sky view factor (SVF) in ENVI-met, a 3D microclimate modeling program, urban spaces were classified as closed, semi-open, and open areas. Meanwhile, the green roof types were subdivided according to the vegetation coverage rates, which included grass, shrubs, and trees. The vegetation ratio was evaluated using ENVI-met to determine which of the 10 scenarios was most effective for each urban space. The thermal environment was most comfortable in semi-open areas. Therefore, the green roof scenario with 70% grass and 30% trees was effective in closed areas, 50% shrubs and 50% trees were best in semi-open areas, and 70% grass with 30% trees, or 30% grass and 70% trees, was best in open areas. This study provides a basis for creating green roof guidelines aimed at improving the urban thermal environment, as well as creating other green infrastructure elements in cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: ENVI-met; urban heat island; green roof; thermal environment; thermal comfort; vegetation ratio ENVI-met; urban heat island; green roof; thermal environment; thermal comfort; vegetation ratio
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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, J.; Shin, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, S.-W.; An, K. Efficient Plant Types and Coverage Rates for Optimal Green Roof to Reduce Urban Heat Island Effect. Sustainability 2022, 14, 2146. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042146

AMA Style

Park J, Shin Y, Kim S, Lee S-W, An K. Efficient Plant Types and Coverage Rates for Optimal Green Roof to Reduce Urban Heat Island Effect. Sustainability. 2022; 14(4):2146. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042146

Chicago/Turabian Style

Park, Jinsil, Yeeun Shin, Suyeon Kim, Sang-Woo Lee, and Kyungjin An. 2022. "Efficient Plant Types and Coverage Rates for Optimal Green Roof to Reduce Urban Heat Island Effect" Sustainability 14, no. 4: 2146. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042146

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