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Article

Transport Airships for Scheduled Supply and Emergency Response in the Arctic

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Department of Supply Chain Management, I.H. Asper School of Business, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V4, Canada
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Division of Business and Hospitality Management, College of Professional and Continuing Education, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
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Division of Business and Management, Beijing Normal University—Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai 519085, China
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St. John’s College, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V4, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: José Manuel Vassallo
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5301; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095301
Received: 16 April 2021 / Revised: 6 May 2021 / Accepted: 6 May 2021 / Published: 10 May 2021
As climate change progresses, the Arctic Ocean creates opportunities for new resource development and navigation routes. Such economic opportunities are attractive, but carry with them an increased risk of accidents and oil spills. Existing methods of emergency response face enormous challenges in the Arctic because of its lack of transportation infrastructure and support services. Cargo airships offer a practical solution. Many airship designs are proposed that can carry over 30 tons, travel long distances at 150 km per hour, and land close to the emergency site. However, it is difficult to justify the economics of having enough capacity waiting and available to be marshaled in response to infrequent events. One solution is to develop a synergy with a new civilian cargo airship industry that can serve the regular transport needs of remote communities and mining operations. Through contingency contracts with these civilian operations, the Government of Canada could stretch its budgets and have access to the latest airship models and trained crews at locations across the Arctic. This paper gives valuable insight into the development of cargo airships. Advances in technology that make cargo airships a practical option in the 21st century are reviewed, and five competing airship designs are discussed. A case study of an existing rare earth mine proposal is used to illustrate the cost comparison of roads versus airships that could provide contingency services. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; Arctic Ocean; oil spills; emergency response; cargo airships; hydrogen; mining climate change; Arctic Ocean; oil spills; emergency response; cargo airships; hydrogen; mining
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MDPI and ACS Style

Prentice, B.E.; Lau, Y.-Y.; Ng, A.K.Y. Transport Airships for Scheduled Supply and Emergency Response in the Arctic. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5301. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095301

AMA Style

Prentice BE, Lau Y-Y, Ng AKY. Transport Airships for Scheduled Supply and Emergency Response in the Arctic. Sustainability. 2021; 13(9):5301. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095301

Chicago/Turabian Style

Prentice, Barry E., Yui-Yip Lau, and Adolf K. Y. Ng. 2021. "Transport Airships for Scheduled Supply and Emergency Response in the Arctic" Sustainability 13, no. 9: 5301. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095301

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