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Article

Municipal Solid Waste Management Practices and Challenges in the Southeastern Coastal Cities of Sri Lanka

1
Faculty of Engineering, University Park, South Eastern University of Sri Lanka, Oluvil 32360, Sri Lanka
2
School of Engineering, RMIT University, P.O. Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC 3001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Isabella Pecorini
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4556; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084556
Received: 12 March 2021 / Revised: 13 April 2021 / Accepted: 15 April 2021 / Published: 20 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Municipal Solid Waste Management in a Circular Economy)
Municipal solid waste management (MSWM) has become a major challenge in Sri Lanka for post-conflict development activities. Many urban areas are facing severe problems in managing 10 to 50 metric tons of waste per day. However, limited research has been carried out to identify the key issues and policy gaps in MSWM. This research studies the existing complexities of MSWM processes, practices, and emerging challenges in three highly congested urban areas in the south-eastern coast of Sri Lanka. A mixed method strategy using field observations, semi-structured interviews and secondary data sources was employed for the data collection. The study revealed that, although the MSWM systems in the urban areas include all necessary elements, their effectiveness and efficiency are not satisfactory due to poor or non-segregation of waste at the source of generation; lack of resources; absence of regulation to reduce waste generation and control polluters; absence of regular collection schedule; and lack of technical know-how and initiatives. The recommendations drawn from the study include feasible solutions and immediate measures required to improve the MSWM before the related environmental and public health problems become a social catastrophe. The recommendations will also greatly contribute in the achievement of developing sustainable cities. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental hazard; municipal waste; segregation; treatment; waste management environmental hazard; municipal waste; segregation; treatment; waste management
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saja, A.M.A.; Zimar, A.M.Z.; Junaideen, S.M. Municipal Solid Waste Management Practices and Challenges in the Southeastern Coastal Cities of Sri Lanka. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4556. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084556

AMA Style

Saja AMA, Zimar AMZ, Junaideen SM. Municipal Solid Waste Management Practices and Challenges in the Southeastern Coastal Cities of Sri Lanka. Sustainability. 2021; 13(8):4556. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084556

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saja, Abdul Majeed Aslam, Abdul Majeed Zarafath Zimar, and Sainulabdeen Mohamed Junaideen. 2021. "Municipal Solid Waste Management Practices and Challenges in the Southeastern Coastal Cities of Sri Lanka" Sustainability 13, no. 8: 4556. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084556

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