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Article

Living Longer with Disability: Economic Implications for Healthcare Sustainability

1
Dipartimento di Scienze Aziendali, Università degli Studi di Bergamo, 24127 Bergamo, Italy
2
Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Francisco Ródenas Rigla, Jordi Garcés Ferrer and Ascensión Doñate-Martínez
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4467; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084467
Received: 8 March 2021 / Revised: 6 April 2021 / Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published: 16 April 2021
This work focuses on the economic implications of the relationship between life expectancy, the number of years lost to disability and per-capita total health expenditure. The primary goal of the paper is to identify and plot the correlation between healthcare expenditure and the global increase in life expectancy, in order to assess if, and how, the way longer average lifespans are achieved affects healthcare sustainability. Datasets regarding the United States, the European Union and the five largest emerging healthcare systems (i.e., Brazil, the Russian Federation, India, China and South Africa) were obtained from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and the WHO Health Expenditure Statistics Repository. All analysis was performed on 2017 data. The results of the analysis showed the number of years lost to disability to be a linear function of life expectancy at birth (male R2 = 0.61; female R2 = 0.47), and per-capita total health expenditure to be an exponential function of the number of years lost to disability (male R2 = 0.60; female R2 = 0.65). This implies that improving life expectancy via social policies bears negative consequences in terms of healthcare sustainability, unless the number of years lost to disability is reduced too. Further studies should narrow the sample of countries and causes of years lost due to disability, to better inform future policy efforts. View Full-Text
Keywords: socialized healthcare; life expectancy; sustainability socialized healthcare; life expectancy; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Danovi, A.; Olgiati, S.; D’Amico, A. Living Longer with Disability: Economic Implications for Healthcare Sustainability. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4467. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084467

AMA Style

Danovi A, Olgiati S, D’Amico A. Living Longer with Disability: Economic Implications for Healthcare Sustainability. Sustainability. 2021; 13(8):4467. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084467

Chicago/Turabian Style

Danovi, Alessandro, Stefano Olgiati, and Alessandro D’Amico. 2021. "Living Longer with Disability: Economic Implications for Healthcare Sustainability" Sustainability 13, no. 8: 4467. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084467

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