Next Article in Journal
An Appraisal of Urine Derivatives Integrated in the Nitrogen and Phosphorus Inputs of a Lettuce Soilless Cultivation System
Previous Article in Journal
Proximity Indexing of Public Transport Terminals in Metro Manila
Review

Indigenous Environmental Justice within Marine Ecosystems: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Indigenous Peoples’ Involvement in Marine Governance and Management

1
School of Environment, The University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, Lincoln 69040, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Craig Anthony (Tony) Arnold and Emmanuel Frimpong Boamah
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4217; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084217
Received: 12 March 2021 / Revised: 5 April 2021 / Accepted: 6 April 2021 / Published: 10 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Justice and Ecosystem Co-governance)
We develop and apply a systematic review methodology to identify and understand how the peer-reviewed literature characterises Indigenous peoples’ involvement in marine governance and management approaches in terms of equity and justice worldwide. We reviewed the peer-reviewed English-language research articles between January 2015 and September 2020 for examples of Indigenous peoples’ involvement in marine governance and management using the analytical lens of environmental justice. The majority of research studies highlighted that Indigenous peoples experienced some form of environmental injustice linked to existing marine governance and management, most notably in the context of inequitable decision-making procedures surrounding the establishment and operation of marine protected areas. However, there are significant gaps in the current literature, including a notable absence of studies exploring Indigenous women and other gender minorities’ involvement in marine planning and management and the limited number of studies about Indigenous peoples living throughout Asia, the Arctic, Russia, and Africa. More studies are needed to explore collaborative and intersectional approaches, including co-governance and co-management and ecosystem-based management, and critically evaluate what constitutes inclusive, equitable, and just marine governance and management processes, practices, and outcomes for different Indigenous peoples occupying diverse social–ecological systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous people; environmental justice; marine governance and management; collaborative natural resource management; marine protected areas; marine spatial planning; co-governance and co-management; ecosystem-based management; indigenous knowledge (ILK); food security indigenous people; environmental justice; marine governance and management; collaborative natural resource management; marine protected areas; marine spatial planning; co-governance and co-management; ecosystem-based management; indigenous knowledge (ILK); food security
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Parsons, M.; Taylor, L.; Crease, R. Indigenous Environmental Justice within Marine Ecosystems: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Indigenous Peoples’ Involvement in Marine Governance and Management. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4217. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084217

AMA Style

Parsons M, Taylor L, Crease R. Indigenous Environmental Justice within Marine Ecosystems: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Indigenous Peoples’ Involvement in Marine Governance and Management. Sustainability. 2021; 13(8):4217. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084217

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parsons, Meg, Lara Taylor, and Roa Crease. 2021. "Indigenous Environmental Justice within Marine Ecosystems: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Indigenous Peoples’ Involvement in Marine Governance and Management" Sustainability 13, no. 8: 4217. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084217

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop