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Article

Animal Welfare and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals—Broadening Students’ Perspectives

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Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7054, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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SLU Swedish Biodiversity Centre, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7016, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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Department of Animal Environment and Health, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7068, 750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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Department of Animal Science and Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: George K. Symeon
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3328; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063328
Received: 12 December 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2021 / Accepted: 15 March 2021 / Published: 17 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Welfare and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals)
The mutually beneficial relationships between improving animal welfare (AW) and achieving the United Nations (UN) sustainable development goals (SDGs) were further explored and compared to previous work. This was done in the context of a doctoral training course where students selected at least six SDGs and reasoned around their impact on AW and vice versa. Then, students rated the strength of the SDG—AW links. Lastly, students engaged in an assessment exercise. Students reported an overall mutually beneficial relationship between AW and all SDGs, yet with significant differences in strength for SDGs 4, 11, 10, 12 and 13 to that previously found by experts. Students considered SDG 12: Responsible consumption and production the most promising way to integrate AW targets. This study further supports the positive role of AW in the success of the UN’s strategy. Still, the magnitude of the anticipated impacts is modified by stakeholder, context and experience. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability; animal welfare; education for sustainable development (ESD); learning environment; critical thinking sustainability; animal welfare; education for sustainable development (ESD); learning environment; critical thinking
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MDPI and ACS Style

Olmos Antillón, G.; Tunón, H.; de Oliveira, D.; Jones, M.; Wallenbeck, A.; Swanson, J.; Blokhuis, H.; Keeling, L. Animal Welfare and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals—Broadening Students’ Perspectives. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3328. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063328

AMA Style

Olmos Antillón G, Tunón H, de Oliveira D, Jones M, Wallenbeck A, Swanson J, Blokhuis H, Keeling L. Animal Welfare and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals—Broadening Students’ Perspectives. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3328. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063328

Chicago/Turabian Style

Olmos Antillón, Gabriela, Håkan Tunón, Daiana de Oliveira, Michael Jones, Anna Wallenbeck, Janice Swanson, Harry Blokhuis, and Linda Keeling. 2021. "Animal Welfare and the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals—Broadening Students’ Perspectives" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3328. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063328

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