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Open AccessArticle

Pollen and Fungal Spores Evaluation in Relation to Occupants and Microclimate in Indoor Workplaces

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Italian Workers’ Compensation Authority (INAIL), Monte Porzio Catone, 00078 Rome, Italy
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Academic Editor: Giacomo Salvadori
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063154
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 5 March 2021 / Accepted: 9 March 2021 / Published: 13 March 2021
Indoor air quality depends on many internal or external factors mutually interacting in a dynamic and complex system, which also includes indoor workplaces, where subjects are exposed to many pollutants, including biocontaminants such as pollen and fungal spores. In this context, the occupants interact actively with their environment through actions, modifying indoor environmental conditions to achieve their own thermal comfort. Actions such as opening/closing doors and windows and turning on/off air conditioning could have effects on workers’ health. The present study explored the contribution of human occupants to pollen and fungal spore levels in indoor workplaces, combining aerobiological, microclimate, and worker monitoring during summer and winter campaigns. We evaluated the overall time spent by the workers in the office, the workers’ actions regarding non-working days and working days, and non-working hours and working hours, during two campaigns of pollen and fungal spore monitoring. Our results showed that the biocontaminant values depend on many mutually interacting factors; hence, the role of all of the factors involved should be investigated. In this regard, aerobiological monitoring should be a valid tool for the management of occupational allergies, providing additional information to improve occupational health protection strategies. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational allergy; pollen; fungal spores; aerobiological particles; aerobiological monitoring; occupants; indoor workplaces; occupational health occupational allergy; pollen; fungal spores; aerobiological particles; aerobiological monitoring; occupants; indoor workplaces; occupational health
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MDPI and ACS Style

D’Ovidio, M.C.; Di Renzi, S.; Capone, P.; Pelliccioni, A. Pollen and Fungal Spores Evaluation in Relation to Occupants and Microclimate in Indoor Workplaces. Sustainability 2021, 13, 3154. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063154

AMA Style

D’Ovidio MC, Di Renzi S, Capone P, Pelliccioni A. Pollen and Fungal Spores Evaluation in Relation to Occupants and Microclimate in Indoor Workplaces. Sustainability. 2021; 13(6):3154. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063154

Chicago/Turabian Style

D’Ovidio, Maria C.; Di Renzi, Simona; Capone, Pasquale; Pelliccioni, Armando. 2021. "Pollen and Fungal Spores Evaluation in Relation to Occupants and Microclimate in Indoor Workplaces" Sustainability 13, no. 6: 3154. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063154

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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