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Open AccessArticle

Understanding Socio-Technological Systems Change through an Indigenous Community-Based Participatory Framework

1
Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
2
Department of Writing, Rhetoric and American Cultures, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
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Native American Institute, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
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Visiting Scholar, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
5
Department of Humanities, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
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Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ali Elkamel
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2257; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042257
Received: 26 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 14 February 2021 / Published: 19 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Research on Socio-Technological Sustainability Transitions)
Moving toward a sustainable global society requires substantial change in both social and technological systems. This sustainability is dependent not only on addressing the environmental impacts of current social and technological systems, but also on addressing the social, economic and political harms that continue to be perpetuated through systematic forms of oppression and the exclusion of Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) communities. To adequately identify and address these harms, we argue that scientists, practitioners, and communities need a transdisciplinary framework that integrates multiple types of knowledge, in particular, Indigenous and experiential knowledge. Indigenous knowledge systems embrace relationality and reciprocity rather than extraction and oppression, and experiential knowledge grounds transition priorities in lived experiences rather than expert assessments. Here, we demonstrate how an Indigenous, experiential, and community-based participatory framework for understanding and advancing socio-technological system transitions can facilitate the co-design and co-development of community-owned energy systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous knowledge; community-based participatory approaches; socio-technological systems transitions; transdisciplinarity; environmental justice; medicine wheel; knowledge sharing Indigenous knowledge; community-based participatory approaches; socio-technological systems transitions; transdisciplinarity; environmental justice; medicine wheel; knowledge sharing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schaefer, M.; Schmitt Olabisi, L.; Arola, K.; Poitra, C.M.; Matz, E.; Seigel, M.; Schelly, C.; Adesanya, A.; Bessette, D. Understanding Socio-Technological Systems Change through an Indigenous Community-Based Participatory Framework. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2257. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042257

AMA Style

Schaefer M, Schmitt Olabisi L, Arola K, Poitra CM, Matz E, Seigel M, Schelly C, Adesanya A, Bessette D. Understanding Socio-Technological Systems Change through an Indigenous Community-Based Participatory Framework. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):2257. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042257

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schaefer, Marie; Schmitt Olabisi, Laura; Arola, Kristin; Poitra, Christie M.; Matz, Elise; Seigel, Marika; Schelly, Chelsea; Adesanya, Adewale; Bessette, Doug. 2021. "Understanding Socio-Technological Systems Change through an Indigenous Community-Based Participatory Framework" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 2257. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042257

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