Next Article in Journal
The Impact of Work Engagement on Future Occupational Rankings, Wages, Unemployment, and Disability Pensions—A Register-Based Study of a Representative Sample of Finnish Employees
Previous Article in Journal
Exploration of the Impact of China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on Economic Growth in Asia and North Africa along the Belt and Road (B&R) Initiative
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Human Dimensions of Coastal Adaptation Strategies
Open AccessArticle

Towards Integration of Climate Disaster Risk and Waste Management: A Case Study of Urban and Rural Coastal Communities in the Philippines

1
Ocean Policy Research Institute, Sasakawa Peace Foundation, Tokyo 1058024, Japan
2
Social Development Research Centre, De La Salle University, Manila 2401, Philippines
3
International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Miyagi 9800845, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chad McGuire
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1624; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041624
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 28 January 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Human Dimensions of Coastal Adaptation Strategies)
Coastal communities are exposed to various environmental risks, including natural hazards such as storm surges and flooding. As climate change has escalated, the management of such dangers has grown in importance and urgency, particularly among states with long coast lines. Climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction have attracted attention from policymakers in Southeast Asia, which is one of the most disaster-prone regions. Coastal community resilience, however, is not determined by climate and disaster risks alone, but by other factors as well. Waste pollution is an environmental threat that may affect those who are dependent on marine resources. These multiple factors contribute to coastal resilience and are, in fact, addressed separately as different issues; therefore, conflicts or synergies in respective countermeasures often become oversights in the policy-making processes. Through a case study of key Philippine stakeholders, including fishing communities, we identified impacts of climate change, natural hazards, and waste on the livelihoods of community residents and the interplay among these factors. We aim to better understand the situation on the ground and contribute by improving policy recommendations for coastal communities. An integrated approach to enhance coastal adaptation is critical for maximising the effectiveness of the limited resources of communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change adaptation; disaster risk reduction; coastal resilience; waste management climate change adaptation; disaster risk reduction; coastal resilience; waste management
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Yoshioka, N.; Era, M.; Sasaki, D. Towards Integration of Climate Disaster Risk and Waste Management: A Case Study of Urban and Rural Coastal Communities in the Philippines. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041624

AMA Style

Yoshioka N, Era M, Sasaki D. Towards Integration of Climate Disaster Risk and Waste Management: A Case Study of Urban and Rural Coastal Communities in the Philippines. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041624

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yoshioka, Nagisa; Era, Marlon; Sasaki, Daisuke. 2021. "Towards Integration of Climate Disaster Risk and Waste Management: A Case Study of Urban and Rural Coastal Communities in the Philippines" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 1624. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041624

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop