Next Article in Journal
Promoting User Participation of Shared Mobility in the Sharing Economy: Evidence from Chinese Bike Sharing Services
Previous Article in Journal
Sensory Characteristics of Dairy By-Products as Potential Milk Replacers in Ice Cream
Article

Evolving Institutional Arrangements for Use of an Ecosystem Approach in Restoring Great Lakes Areas of Concern

1
Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA
2
Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9C 1A2, Canada
3
Booth School of Engineering Practice and Technology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 0A3, Canada
4
Great Lakes Toxicology and Ecology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN 55804, USA
5
School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ifigenia Kagalou
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1532; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031532
Received: 8 December 2020 / Revised: 13 January 2021 / Accepted: 26 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
The 1987 Canada-U.S. Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement required Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) be collaboratively generated between local stakeholders and government agencies to implement an ecosystem approach in cleaning up 43 historically polluted Areas of Concern (AOCs) throughout the Laurentian Great Lakes. The institutional arrangements that have emerged over the past 35 years to foster an ecosystem approach in RAPs are expected to have changed over time and be varied in some aspects—reflecting unique socio-ecological contexts of each AOC—while also sharing some characteristics that were either derived from the minimally prescribed framework or developed convergently. Here we surveyed institutional arrangements to describe changes over time relevant to advancing an ecosystem approach in restoring beneficial uses in the 43 AOCs. While eight AOCs evidenced little institutional change, the remaining 35 AOCs demonstrated a growing involvement of local organizations in RAPs, which has enhanced local capacity and ownership and helped strengthen connections to broader watershed initiatives. We also noted an expansion of strategic partnerships that has strengthened science-policy-management linkages and an increasing emphasis on sustainability among RAP institutions. Our study details how institutional arrangements in a decentralized restoration program have evolved to implement an ecosystem approach and address new challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: ecosystem-based management; institutional frameworks; water governance; remedial action plans ecosystem-based management; institutional frameworks; water governance; remedial action plans
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Alsip, P.J.; Hartig, J.H.; Krantzberg, G.; Williams, K.C.; Wondolleck, J. Evolving Institutional Arrangements for Use of an Ecosystem Approach in Restoring Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1532. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031532

AMA Style

Alsip PJ, Hartig JH, Krantzberg G, Williams KC, Wondolleck J. Evolving Institutional Arrangements for Use of an Ecosystem Approach in Restoring Great Lakes Areas of Concern. Sustainability. 2021; 13(3):1532. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031532

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alsip, Peter J., John H. Hartig, Gail Krantzberg, Kathleen C. Williams, and Julia Wondolleck. 2021. "Evolving Institutional Arrangements for Use of an Ecosystem Approach in Restoring Great Lakes Areas of Concern" Sustainability 13, no. 3: 1532. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031532

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop